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I am looking for a complete and credible diagram, featuring "all" programming paradigms (OOP, AOP & also, maybe in parallel, imperative, functional, declarative, etc...).

EDIT: Already -2 and 3 Close requests, without any justification.

If you are not interested in the question and have no reason to downvote it, please just skip it. Or provide a reason. Clicking on an arrow is easy. Expressing yourself seems harder.

EDIT 2:

On enter link description here, you can see a "Programming paradigms" on the right , that contains the following data :

Action
Agent-oriented
Aspect-oriented
Automata-based
Component-based
Flow-based
Pipelined
Concatenative
Concurrent computing
Relativistic programming
Data-driven
Declarative (contrast: Imperative)
Constraint
Dataflow
Cell-oriented (spreadsheets)
Reactive
Intensional
Functional
Logic
Abductive logic
Answer set
Constraint logic
Functional logic
Inductive logic
End-user programming
Event-driven
Service-oriented
Time-driven
Expression-oriented
Feature-oriented
Function-level (contrast: Value-level)
Generic
Imperative (contrast: Declarative)
Procedural
Language-oriented
Discipline-specific
Domain-specific
Grammar-oriented
Dialecting
Intentional
Metaprogramming
Automatic
Reflective
Attribute-oriented
Template
Policy-based
Non-structured (contrast: Structured)
Array
Nondeterministic
Parallel computing
Process-oriented
Programming in the large and small
Semantic
Structured (contrast: Non-structured)
Modular (contrast: Monolithic)
Object-oriented
By separation of concerns:
Aspect-oriented
Role-oriented
Subject-oriented
Class-based
Prototype-based
Recursive
Value-level (contrast: Function-level)

That representation of "programming paradigms" is totally linear and does not show how the various paradigms derive from each other, which is precisely what I'd like to see.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Peter Van Roy has this diagram in his book Concepts, Techniques, and Models of Computer Programming, which shows the relationship between various kernels of languages. I think it is a very interesting diagram, but like all attempts to lump languages into "paradigms", you should take it with a grain of salt. There are aspects of languages that don't neatly divide up into paradigms and it's not clear that making this distinction is beneficial.

I also recommend this article by Shriram Krishnamurthi arguing why "paradigms" are not a useful idea anymore.

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This is precisely what I was looking for. Many thanks. –  Skippy Fastol Jul 11 '12 at 8:01

I recently did something similar to what you're after.

Dynamic zoom here: http://zoom.it/6rJp

Original: http://griffsgraphs.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/programming-paradigms_label2.png

You can make your own using Gephi and Freebase.

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Here's a fairly elaborate one of individual languages:

http://griffsgraphs.com/2012/07/01/programming-languages-influences/

I don't know what it would mean to have a diagram of programming paradigms - many of the concepts you listed are orthogonal, and it's unclear what the meaning of the edges in the diagram would be.

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1  
A paradigm diagram, pinned on a wall, is perfect to impress young students and customers. –  Denys Séguret Jul 10 '12 at 12:38
1  
And completely destroy your credibility with anybody who knows what the words on the diagram mean? –  Gian Jul 10 '12 at 12:40
2  
Of course. Even showing a programmer the programming languages influence diagram is sure to generate a hot debate... –  Denys Séguret Jul 10 '12 at 12:42
    
@Gian : Thanks but my priority here is Taxonomy, more than programming languages themselves. There are already numerous graphs about programming languages history. –  Skippy Fastol Jul 10 '12 at 12:48
1  
I still don't get it. There seems no sensible order (partial or total!) over these terms. It's like you're asking for a taxonomic view of "Banana", "Pink", and "Jealousy". –  Gian Jul 10 '12 at 14:23

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