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Let's say I have a method like this into my activity, and set it as onClick field of different buttons into xml:

public void onButtonPressedFromView(View button) {
   switch(button.getId()) {
   case (R.id.button1) :
      //do something
      break;
   case (R.id.button2) :
      //do something different
      break;
   default :
      //default action
      break;
   }
}

It comes out that, if I press for instance button1, the id obtained with button.getId() is always bigger of 1 than the id obtained with R.id.button1. It's quite easy to solve, I just changed my code into

switch(button.getId() - 1)

but I don't like it, and would like to understand the difference between these two ways of obtaining the id of a view.

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Implement public void onClick(View v) {} method instead of onButtonPressedFromView. – AkashG Jul 10 '12 at 12:58
    
Just normal buttons, such as <Button android:id="@+id/button1 android:onClick="onButtonPressedFromView /> and so on. I omitted the rest of xml implementation because it's not important for the context. – b3by Jul 10 '12 at 13:00
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should be comparing known buttons to the presses.

onCreate(...) {
    ...
   Button myButton1 = (Button)findViewById(R.id.somebutton);
   Button myButton2 =....
}



public void onButtonPressedFromView(View button) {
   switch(button.getId()) {
   case (myButton1.getId()) :
      //do something
      break;
   case (myButton2.getId()) :
      //do something different
      break;
   default :
      //default action
      break;
   }
}

It is important to not assume myButton == button. For instance, if you use a button in a ListView it will likely have several instances and can thus only be comparable by the getId() property.

share|improve this answer
    
Alternately, I suppose you could use setTag(object) to identify buttons without specifically having reference to the buttons themselves. I do not believe this is an ideal solution though. – ian.shaun.thomas Jul 10 '12 at 13:15
    
How can you use case with non-constant value in java ? – Gomino Jun 28 '13 at 9:26

Did some testing and I get the same Id's

    TextView tv= (TextView ) findViewById(R.id.my_textview);

    Log.i("Test.java","ID 1 : " +R.id.my_textview);
    Log.i("Test.java","ID 2 : " +findViewById(R.id.my_textview).getId() );
    Log.i("Test.java","ID 3 : " +tv.getId() );
    tv.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

        public void onClick(View arg0) {
            Log.i("Test.java","ID 4 : " +arg0.getId() );

        }
    });

And here is my Log:

07-10 15:10:19.906: I/Test.java(3680): ID 1 : 2131165227
07-10 15:10:19.906: I/Test.java(3680): ID 2 : 2131165227
07-10 15:10:19.906: I/Test.java(3680): ID 3 : 2131165227
07-10 15:10:21.386: I/Test.java(3680): ID 4 : 2131165227

Try using onClick and report back your findings.

share|improve this answer
    
It works, but I don't want to create a listener for every button inside my layout. What I have in mind is a single entry point for all the methods that can be called from the buttons. – b3by Jul 10 '12 at 13:36
    
You should create just 1 listener, this was just an example. Funny how tencent says not to not assume myButton == button. But he does exactly the same by predefining the same views you use, although it looks better. – Tim Dev Jul 10 '12 at 13:38
    
In the instance I posted you can make that assumption. I only posted that as a warning. If you create a ListView, views are reused and you can not assume myButton == button. I do not know how the op is using this code so the warning is completely relevant in my opinion. Instance ID's are the safe way to make comparisons. – ian.shaun.thomas Jul 10 '12 at 15:00

had same problem. Add import to your class:

import com.foo.yourapp.R; It solves problem. I don't know reason of such behavior. import com.foo.yourapp.R;

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I think I have encountered the same problem. Hope it was the same with you and my experience solves your problem.

I had this problem because I wrongly put id value in relative layout. See this example, value of layout_alignTop and layout_toRightOf are wrong. They should not contain a + sign. I don't know whether you did the same. But it will cause id values messy.

<ImageButton
        android:id="@+id/btn_next"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignTop="@+id/btn_start"
        android:layout_toRightOf="@+id/btn_start"
        android:contentDescription=""
        android:src="@drawable/forward" />
share|improve this answer

I had same problem. Add import to your class:

import com.foo.yourapp.R;

It solves problem. I don't know reason of such behavior.

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