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When running an app onto the simulator, it creates a folder onto the Mac to contain the apps datas in a "Documents" folder. This folder is changed when you delete the app from the simulator, or when you change some app settings into XCode. When you have dozens of apps, it's a nightmare to find the good one by hand.

Is there a way to easily access this folder ?

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just gonna try answering. How about logging it, like this:

    //App Directory & Directory Contents
   NSString *appFolderPath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] resourcePath];
   NSFileManager *fileManager = [NSFileManager defaultManager];  
   NSLog(@"App Directory is: %@", appFolderPath);
   NSLog(@"Directory Contents:\n%@", [fileManager directoryContentsAtPath: appFolderPath]);
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Great. Next I do Cmd+Maj+G into the finder and it's fine ! – Oliver Jul 11 '12 at 12:31

What I do is create a link in the Finder sidebar to the simulator folder. It is approximately:

/Users/userName/Library/Application/Support/iPhone/Simulator/5.0/Applications/

Then I have that folder sorted by 'last modified'. Once I find the app folder for the app I am working on, I expand it to display the app (and see the app name) and also set a color on the folder. The Finder sometimes doesn't keep the folder sorted by 'last modified' unless the window is closed and reopened.

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A wrong path but an amazing idea! Thanks mate! – Rudolf Adamkovic Jun 4 '13 at 9:09

The location in general is: /Users/yourusername/Library/Application Support/iPhone Simulator/7.1/Applications/appcode/Documents/yourdocuments.db

'yourusername': username you used for your development machine
'appcode': application identifier that is a series of numbers such as: 32F88907-B348-4764-9819-A5B6F9169FB7 (unique to your app)

the version number (7.1) in the path depends on the version of Xcode and hence the simulator.

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directoryContentsAtPath: is deprecated.

Instead use contentsOfDirectoryAtPath:error:

 //App Directory & Directory Contents
   NSString *appFolderPath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] resourcePath];
   NSFileManager *fileManager = [NSFileManager defaultManager];  
   NSLog(@"App Directory is: %@", appFolderPath);
    NSLog(@"Directory Contents:\n%@", [fileManager contentsOfDirectoryAtPath:appFolderPath error:nil]);

See https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/Foundation/Classes/NSFileManager_Class/#//apple_ref/occ/instm/NSFileManager/directoryContentsAtPath:

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Bazinga's answer (along with sebrenner's deprecation notice) is great for Objective-C.

For Swift, the equivalent would be:

let appFolderPath = NSBundle.mainBundle().resourcePath
let fileManager = NSFileManager.defaultManager()
print("App Directory is: \(appFolderPath)")
print("Directory Contents:\n \(fileManager.contentsAtPath(appFolderPath!))")
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