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I'd like to copy a vector to another. The problem is that if I change the vector v1, the second vector v2 is changing too. My goal is to keep the copy intact even if I change the source vector.

import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Vector;

public class CopyElementsOfVectorToVectorExample {

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    //create first Vector object
    Vector v1 = new Vector();

    //Add elements to Vector
    v1.add("1");
    v1.add("2");
    v1.add("3");

    //create another Vector object
    Vector v2 = new Vector(v1.size());  

    v2.setSize(v1.size());
    Collections.copy(v2,v1);


    System.out.println("After copy, Second Vector Contains : " + v2);  
  }}

How can I keep the second copy intact?

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5  
How does your code-snippet illustrate the problem?! –  aioobe Jul 10 '12 at 13:18
1  
This question needs a little more clarification. –  cytinus Jul 11 '12 at 6:09

4 Answers 4

up vote -2 down vote accepted

the problem is if I change the vector v1, the second v2 is changing too ...My goal is to keep the copy intact even if I change the source vector

This is because Collections.copy(v2,v1) make a sallow copy not deep copy.

Make deep copy of your Vector.

Apologize for previous answer.

Edit:

I am assuming that your vector is containing objects of type Serializable. With this approach you can get a deep copy of your collection.

static public Object deepCopy(Object oldObj) throws Exception {
    ObjectOutputStream oos = null;
    ObjectInputStream ois = null;
    try {
        ByteArrayOutputStream bos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); // A
        oos = new ObjectOutputStream(bos); // B
        // serialize and pass the object
        oos.writeObject(oldObj); // C
        oos.flush(); // D
        ByteArrayInputStream bin = new ByteArrayInputStream(
                bos.toByteArray()); // E
        ois = new ObjectInputStream(bin); // F
        // return the new object
        return ois.readObject(); // G
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println("Exception in ObjectCloner = " + e);
        throw (e);
    } finally {
        oos.close();
        ois.close();
    }
}
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1  
...right. For Strings however, this makes little sense, since you can't change them anyway. –  aioobe Jul 10 '12 at 13:17
1  
This is not a deep copy, it’s a shallow copy, and it’s the same as just using the Vector copy constructor. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 10 '12 at 13:25
1  
That's not a deep copy. It does nothing more than new Vector(originalVector). –  JB Nizet Jul 10 '12 at 13:26
1  
@user1514847: There would be a solution if you had an identifiable problem. The code you posted doesn't have the problem you describe. Post code that reproduces the problem you have, and we'll find a solution. –  JB Nizet Jul 10 '12 at 13:34
1  
@user1514847 No, there is a solution. You haven’t shown us the problem. The code you posted works, and nobody here understands what you want. By the way, this is quite frustrating. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 10 '12 at 13:35

[...] I change the vector v1, the second v2 is changing too ...My goal is to keep the copy intact even if I change the source vector ..

The vector contains references to objects. If you change the objects, then the change will be visible from both vectors.

I believe what you're after is a deep copy.

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No, that’s not what the OP wants. he probably wants a shallow copy (his objects are immutable anyway). OP is probably a bit confused, since his code already does what he wants (but see JB’s answer). –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 10 '12 at 13:13
2  
If the OP is experiencing that a change in vector 1 affects vector 2, I doubt that he's using strings in his "real" code. –  aioobe Jul 10 '12 at 13:16

Your code above is fine, although too complex. It could be reduced to

Vector copy = new Vector(original);

Also, you should avoid Vector, and use ArrayList instead.

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i have to use vector... –  researcher Jul 10 '12 at 13:17
1  
@user1514847 Seriously? Why? They are deprecated for non-cross-thread usage, and even there you have better data structures. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 10 '12 at 13:27
2  
@user1514847: there is no way your above code exhibits the behavior you're describing. Edit your question, and paste code that reproduces the problem that you're seeing. I have the feeling that you're not storing Strings in your vector, and that you're not modifying the vector, but the objects it contains. String being immutable, what I describe is impossible with Strings. –  JB Nizet Jul 10 '12 at 13:28
    
no it's not a string, i have used an objects that i create it –  researcher Jul 10 '12 at 13:35
    
@KonradRudolph hes probably using J2ME or Blackberry which do not support ArrayList –  S-K' May 3 '13 at 18:28

You can use Below code to clone a vector.

Vector v1 = new Vector();

//Add elements to Vector
v1.add("1");
v1.add("2");
v1.add("3");

//create another Vector object
Vector v2 = (Vector)v1.clone();  
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