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The code below server to show the number of integer in a list.

(defun isNum (N)
  (and (<= N 9) (>= N 0)))

(defun count-numbers (list)
  (let ((count 0))
    (dolist (item list count)
      (cond
       ((null list) nil)
       (((and (<= N 9) (>= N 0))) item)(incf count))
       (setq(0 + count))))))

I get the error A' is not of the expected typeREAL' when I run the command (count-numbers '(3 4 5 6 a 7 b) )

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2  
A basic Lisp introduction can be found here: cs.cmu.edu/~dst/LispBook/index.html –  Rainer Joswig Jul 10 '12 at 17:06

2 Answers 2

Yet another way to do it would be:

(reduce
 #'(lambda (a b)
     (if (numberp b) (1+ a) a))
 '(3 4 5 6 a 7 b) :initial-value 0) ; 5

I.e. process the sequence in a way that you are given at each iteration the result of the previous iteration + the next member of the sequence. Start with zero and increment the result each time the element in the sequence is a number.

EDIT

Sorry, I haven't seen Inaimathi mentioned count-if. That would be probably better.

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I'm surprised it runs at all, given that your cond is improperly constructed, you switch to infix notation in the unnecessarily side-effect-generating bit of your code and you're using unbound variables in count-numbers. Hypothetically, if it did run, that error sounds about right. You're doing numeric comparisons on a parameter (and those error on non-numeric input).

I've got my codereview hat on today, so lets go through this a bit more in-depth.


Lisp (it actually doesn't matter which, afaik this applies to CL, Scheme and all the mongrels) uses lower-case-snake-case-with-dashes, and not lowerCamelCase for variable and function names.

(defun is-num (n)
  (and (<= n 9) (>= n 0)))

Common Lisp convention is to end a predicate with p or -p rather than begin them with is-. Scheme has the (IMO better) convention of ending predicates with ? instead

(defun num-p (n)
  (and (<= n 9) (>= n 0)))

((and (<= N 9) (>= N 0))) is not how you call a function. You actually need to use its name, not just attempt to call its body. This is the source of one of the many errors you'd get if you tried to run this code.

(defun count-numbers (list)
  (let ((count 0))
    (dolist (item list count)
      (cond
       ((null list) nil)
       ((num-p item) item)(incf count))
       (setq(0 + count))))))

numberp already exists, and does a type check on its input rather than attempting numeric comparisons. You should probably use that instead.

(defun count-numbers (list)
  (let ((count 0))
    (dolist (item list count)
      (cond
       ((null list) nil)
       ((numberp item) item)(incf count))
       (setq(0 + count))))))

((numberp item) item) (incf count)) probably doesn't do what you think it does as a cond clause. It actually gets treated as two separate clauses; one checks whether item is a number, and returns it if it is. The second tries to check the variable incf and returns count if it evaluates to t (which it doesn't, and won't). What you seem to want is to increment the counter count when you find a number in your list, which means you should put that incf clause in with the item.

(defun count-numbers (list)
  (let ((count 0))
    (dolist (item list count)
      (cond ((null list) nil)
            ((numberp item) 
             (incf count)
             item))
      (setq (0 + count)))))

(setq (0 + count)) is the wrong thing for three reasons

  • You seem to have tripped back into infix notation, which means that the second bit there is actually attempting to call the function 0 with the variables + and count as arguments.
  • You don't have a second part to the setq, which means you're trying to set the above to NIL implicitly.
  • You don't actually need to set anything in order to return a value

At this point, we finally have a piece of code that will evaluate and run properly (and it doesn't throw the error you mention above).

(defun count-numbers (list)
  (let ((count 0))
    (dolist (item list count)
      (cond ((null list) nil)
            ((numberp item) 
             (incf count)
             item))
      count)))

dolist is an iteration construct that does something for each element in a given list. That means you don't actually need to test for list termination manually with that cond. Also, because dolist doesn't collect results, there's no reason to return item to it. You're also unnecessarily shadowing the local count you declare in the let.

(defun count-numbers (list)
  (let ((count 0))
    (dolist (item list)
      (when (numberp item) (incf count)))
    count))

As usual, you can do all this with a simpler loop call.

(defun count-numbers (list)
  (loop for item in list
        when (numberp item) sum 1))

which makes the counter implicit and saves you from needing to return it manually. In fact, unless this was specifically an exercise to write your own iteration function, Common Lisp has a built in count-if, which takes predicate sequence [some other options] and returns the count of items in sequence that match predicate. If you wanted to name count-numbers specifically, for stylistic reasons, you could just

(defun count-numbers (list) (count-if #'numberp list))

and be done with it.


In conclusion, good try, but please try reading up on the language family for realzies before asking further questions.

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Thanks Inaimathi! Im still new to LISP, and thanks for your complete guidance here. Thanks a lot. –  Alvin Huan Jul 11 '12 at 0:24

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