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I'm trying to create an AJAX script that will take two GET variables, class and method, and map them to methods we've designed (similar to how CodeIgniter acts for ajax, I'm pretty sure). Since I'm relying on user input to determine what class and method to execute I'm worried that there may be some way for a hacker to use that technique to their advantage.

The code:

//Grab and clean (just in case, why not) the class and method variables from GET
$class = urlencode(trim($_GET['c']));
$method = urlencode(trim($_GET['m']));

//Ensure the passed function is callable
if(method_exists($class, $method)){
    $class::$method();
}

Are there any disadvantages or security watch-outs I should be aware of while using this technique?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
<?php
class AjaxCallableFunction
{
    public static $callable_from_ajax = TRUE;
}

$class = $_POST['class'];
$method = $_POST['method'];

if ( class_exists( $class ) && isset( $class::$callable_from_ajax ) && $class::$callable_from_ajax ) {
    call_user_func( $class, $method );
}

Combine with some of the other answers for best results. Requires PHP 5.3.0 or higher. You could even implement an interface

<?php
interface AjaxCallable {}

class MyClass implements AjaxCallable 
{
    // Your code here
}

$class = $_POST['class'];
$method = $_POST['method'];

if ( class_exists( $class ) && in_array( 'AjaxCallable', class_implements( $class ) ) ) {
    call_user_func( $class, $method );
}

This approach follows OOP principles, is very verbose (Easy to maintain) and doesn't require you to maintain an array of which classes can be called and which cannot.

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1  
That AjaxCallable interface was a great idea, works perfectly. Thanks! –  ACobbs Jul 11 '12 at 13:35
    
Glad it worked for you :) –  Brandon Wamboldt Jul 11 '12 at 14:37

Check if method is allowed to be called by user:

// methods that user can call:
$user_methods = array("method1", "method2", "method3", );

//Ensure the passed function is callable
if(method_exists($class, $method) and in_array($method, $user_methods){
    $class::$method();
}

Otherwise you'll have no control what user will be able to do.

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4  
+1. Whitelist, don't blacklist. –  Polynomial Jul 10 '12 at 14:33
2  
good answer; using method_exists alone can still cause unexpected things to happy. –  Erik Jul 10 '12 at 14:48
    
And awful things, too. –  Theodore R. Smith Jul 30 '12 at 12:18

Considering you are not passing any arguments, this is relatively safe for now. But i would add a list of valid classes in your IF such as:

//Ensure the passed function is callable
if(method_exists($class, $method)){
    if(in_array($class, array('controller1', 'controller2'))){
        $class::$method();
    }
}

This way, a hacker can't really call any possible class in the framework this way but only the ones you allow him to.

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You have to handle with Reflection in this case .

Here's and example of what you need.

<?php
class Apple {
    public function firstMethod() { }
    final protected function secondMethod() { }
    private static function thirdMethod() { }
}

$class = new ReflectionClass('Apple');
$methods = $class->getMethods();
var_dump($methods);
?>

Executing a method could be like this using ReflectionMethods:invoke:

  <?php
class HelloWorld {

    public function sayHelloTo($name) {
        return 'Hello ' . $name;
    }

}

$reflectionMethod = new ReflectionMethod('HelloWorld', 'sayHelloTo');
echo $reflectionMethod->invoke(new HelloWorld(), 'Mike');
?>

So finally we could :

 $class = urlencode(trim($_GET['c']));
  $method = urlencode(trim($_GET['m']));

  $allowed_methods = array("insert", "update", "delete");

  if(method_exists($class, $method) and in_array($method, $allowed_methods){
    $reflectionMethod = new ReflectionMethod($class, $method);
    $reflectionMethod->invoke(new $class, 'First Argument');
   }
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1  
What benefits does using Reflection offer over just calling the method directly? –  ACobbs Jul 10 '12 at 13:52
    
@ACobbs im not sure if you call a method from string first ,next thing is that you wont mismatch the reference if someone attacks you're site. It will call that method using it's reference to the class where it belongs . –  Burimi Jul 10 '12 at 13:55
    
@Cody Could you please add an array for "allowed functions" and basically include Secator's answer in your own? Then your's will be undeniably the only answer I can vote for. –  Theodore R. Smith Jul 10 '12 at 14:30
    
@TheodoreR.Smith done sir ! –  Burimi Jul 10 '12 at 14:45
    
+1 This is the only safe and wise method in this entire thread. –  Theodore R. Smith Jul 30 '12 at 12:17

The urlencode() makes me a bit worried. Even though it might possibly be safe, I would sanitize much more strictly. I'd only allow letters, numbers and underscores. You shouldn't really need any class or method names with other characters. I don't think I've ever seen any.

I use this for A LOT of stuff in all my projects:

function very_safe_string( $string )
{
    return preg_replace("/[^A-Za-z0-9_]/" , '' , $string);
}

And as other posters have mentioned, you should definitely have some type of white list explicitly allowing (for the classes at least, as I'm sure not every class needs to be accessed from ajax). As well as checking class_exists() and method_exists().

I'd also recommend some type of email alert system in place if any of these checks fail. I'm sure you'd like to know if somebody is trying to hax0r j00.

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