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If you run the code below it actually executes the finally after every call to the goto:

    int i = 0;
Found:
    i++;
    try
    {
        throw new Exception();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        goto Found;
    }
    finally
    {
        Console.Write("{0}\t", i);
    }

Why?

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12  
-1 for using GOTO –  Prashant Jul 17 '09 at 5:27
8  
I didn't do this in production code. It was just a hypothetical situation. –  Lucas Jul 17 '09 at 5:28
1  
Main reason to down vote: I thought its noob kind of question, after earning over 4k points!!! I'm sorry... :) –  Prashant Jul 17 '09 at 6:40
4  
Now that you know the answer, you can solve this puzzle: write me a program in which there is a reachable goto which goes to an unreachable label. –  Eric Lippert Jul 17 '09 at 7:17
10  
-1 for using GOTO, really? That's not stupid at all. –  Tempus Jul 17 '09 at 7:17
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8 Answers 8

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Why do you expect it to not execute?

If you have try/catch/finally or try/finally block, finally block executes no matter what code you may have in the try or catch block most of the time.

Instead of goto, consider 'return'.

//imagine this try/catch/finally block is inside a function with return type of bool. 
try
{
    throw new Exception();
}
catch (Exception)
{
    return false; //Let's say you put a return here, finally block still executes.
}
finally
{
    Console.WriteLine("I am in finally!");
}
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I guess I thought a goto would override this. –  Lucas Jul 17 '09 at 5:28
2  
what happens if u have a 'return true;' in the finally block (against the example code above). what get's returned? the false or the true? –  Pure.Krome Jul 17 '09 at 5:33
7  
@Pure.Krome, You can't put a return statement in a finally block. –  Jonathon Watney Jul 17 '09 at 5:34
3  
@Pure.Krome, As Jonathon Watney said, you'll get a "Compiler error CS0157: Control cannot leave the body of a finally clause". –  Moayad Mardini Jul 17 '09 at 5:47
1  
The link to the SO question appears to be dead. –  Scott Chamberlain May 12 '10 at 20:26
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The following text comes from the C# Language Specification (8.9.3 The goto statement)


A goto statement is executed as follows:

  • If the goto statement exits one or more try blocks with associated finally blocks, control is initially transferred to the finally block of the innermost try statement. When and if control reaches the end point of a finally block, control is transferred to the finally block of the next enclosing try statement. This process is repeated until the finally blocks of all intervening try statements have been executed.
  • Control is transferred to the target of the goto statement.
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2  
+1 for referencing the spec. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jul 17 '09 at 5:40
    
+1 for referencing the specification, too. –  Moayad Mardini Jul 17 '09 at 5:50
    
God! The spec is pretty long ;-) –  Lucas Jul 17 '09 at 15:08
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The gist of the answers given - that when control leaves the protected region via any means, whether "return", "goto", "break", "continue" or "throw", the "finally" is executed - is correct. However, I note that almost every answer says something like "the finally block always runs". The finally block does NOT always run. There are many situations in which the finally block does not run.

Who wants to try to list them all?

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According to the spec "The statements of a finally block are always executed when control leaves a try statement. This is true whether the control transfer occurs as a result of normal execution, as a result of executing a break, continue, goto, or return statement, or as a result of propagating an exception out of the try statement." However, I'd say a StackOverflowException is one, because nothing can deal with it as far as I can see. –  Colin Mackay Jul 17 '09 at 7:29
    
Personally, I have mentioned the fact that finally is not always run several times on SO (well, let alone things about killing the process and pulling the plug). e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/833946/… . I think MS docs are not very good warning people about this while they describe finally. I think a very small percentage of .NET devs are aware. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jul 17 '09 at 8:34
1  
Colin, indeed, the key point is WHEN CONTROL LEAVES. If control doesn't leave then the finally block does not execute! The try-protected region might contain an infinite loop, for example. –  Eric Lippert Jul 17 '09 at 14:02
    
@Eric: I totally got this question from your blog post. I also didn't think about an infinite loop in a try/catch block –  Lucas Jul 17 '09 at 14:57
1  
Environment.FailFast(); and OutOfMemoryException will both avoid running the finallly block. –  Neil Whitaker May 12 '10 at 20:29
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Seems reasonable. A finally block is always run after either the try or the catch.

Similarly

try
{
  // do something
  return;
}
finally
{
  // do something else
}

will always run the finally block. EDIT - but see Eric's comments above.

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That's by design. In the exception handler you can take some exception-specific action. In the finally block you should do resource cleanup - that's why the finally block is always executed no matter what the exception handling code is.

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As people have mentioned, finally runs no matter the program flow. Of course, the finally block is optional, so if you don't need it, don't use it.

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That is the point of the finally block. It always executes (pretty much).

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Because a finally statement is expected to execute after leaving the try (or catch when an exception is caught). This includes when you make your goto call.

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