Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to count the characters in a string and found an easy solution counting a single character using the tr operator. Now I want to do this with every character from a to z. The following solution doesn't work because tr/// matches every character.

my @chars = ('a' .. 'z');
foreach my $c (@chars)
{
    $count{$c} = ($text =~ tr/$c//);
}

How do I correctly use the char variable in tr///?

share|improve this question
    
I would do this a bit differently, you can replace any character that is not something from [a-z] with nothing and count the remainders. –  mihaisimi Jul 10 '12 at 14:06
    
I want to know how many there are of each character, not of the whole character class. –  André Stannek Jul 10 '12 at 14:08
1  
Now you have 2 problems? Is there some reason you don't want to just iterate through $text and increment each letter's counter as you see it? –  Wooble Jul 10 '12 at 14:10
    
In my opinion Wooble's comment is a more efficient way to do this than any of the answers below (so I gave an up :) ) –  mihaisimi Jul 10 '12 at 14:15
1  
@André: tr is undoubtedly faster than iterating when you're replacing one set of characters with another. Doing 26 trs, on the other hand, almost certainly won't be (although I haven't benchmarked). –  Wooble Jul 10 '12 at 15:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

tr doesn't support variable interpolation (neither in the SEARCHLIST nor in the REPLACEMENTLIST). You must use eval:

$count{$c} = eval "\$text =~ tr/$c/$c/";  
share|improve this answer
    
This works fine. Could you explain why there is a backslash before $text? I'm new to perl :-) –  André Stannek Jul 10 '12 at 14:25
1  
André: it prevents interpolation of the $text variable in the string, i.e. eval sees the string as '$text =~ tr/a/a/' –  eugene y Jul 10 '12 at 14:29

tr/// doesn't work with variables unless you wrap it in an eval

But there is a nicer way to do this:

$count{$_} = () = $text =~ /$_/g for 'a' .. 'z';

For the TIMTOWTDI:

$count{$_}++ for grep /[a-z]/i, split //, $text;
share|improve this answer
    
Thats a nice solution for my problem but it doesn't answer my question how to use the regex with the variable. So I had to accept eugenes answer. Sorry! –  André Stannek Jul 10 '12 at 14:52
    
@André : tr/// is not a regex operation, though the construct may look similar –  Zaid Jul 10 '12 at 18:17

From the perlop documentation:

tr/AAA/XYZ/

will transliterate any A to X.

Because the transliteration table is built at compile time, neither the SEARCHLIST nor the REPLACEMENTLIST are subjected to double quote interpolation. That means that if you want to use variables, you must use an eval()

Alternatively in your case you can use the s/// operator as:

foreach my $c (@chars) {
   $count{$c} += ($text =~ s/$c//g);
}
share|improve this answer

If you look at the perldoc for tr/SEARCHLIST/REPLACEMENTLIST/cdsr, then you'll see, right at the bottom of the section, the following:

Because the transliteration table is built at compile time, neither the SEARCHLIST nor the REPLACEMENTLIST are subjected to double quote interpolation. That means that if you want to use variables, you must use an eval():

eval "tr/$oldlist/$newlist/";
die $@ if $@;
eval "tr/$oldlist/$newlist/, 1" or die $@;

Thus, you would need an eval to generate a new SEARCHLIST.

This is going to be very inefficient... the code might feel neat, but you're processing the complete string 26 times. You're also not counting uppercase characters.

You'd be better off stepping through the string once and just incrementing counters for each character found.

share|improve this answer

My solution with some modification based from http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=446003

sub lowerLetters {
    my $string = shift;
    my %table;
    @table{split //, $letters_uc} = split //, $letters_lc;
    my $table_re = join '|', map { quotemeta } reverse sort keys %table;
    $string =~ s/($table_re)/$table{$1}/g;
    return if not defined $string;
    return $string;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.