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I have a set of POJOs with a common superclass. Those are stored in a two-dimensional array of type superclass. Now, I want to obtain an object from the array and use methods of the subclass. This means I have to cast them to the subclass. Is there a way to do this without using instanceof?

Update: As a concrete example: http://obviam.net/index.php/the-mvc-pattern-tutorial-building-games/ See: "Add new actions (attack) when an enemy is clicked"

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3  
any reason why you dont want an instanceof? –  TS- Jul 10 '12 at 14:07
3  
Or why you don't define an abstract method (or interface) that each subclass can use to perform whatever work you're trying to do? –  atk Jul 10 '12 at 14:09
3  
Discarding type information you'll need later in the first place is hacky and unaesthetic. If you need to know that the object is of the subclass type, don't put it in a superclass array. ;) –  Louis Wasserman Jul 10 '12 at 14:11
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@tsOverflow: actually instanceof IS considered hacky, because if more subclasses are added in the future you have to hunt through the code looking for all uses to figure out where to add new code. By contrast, either visitor or overriding methods contains the behavior to one place. So from a code maintenance perspective, instanceof is undesirable. –  Kevin Jul 10 '12 at 14:16
1  
@tsOverflow: hello world is a straw man argument. In my experience "throw away prototypes" get built on top of until they are "production quality" and never get thrown away. So in a professional setting, I don't think there's ever an excuse for sub-optimal design. Note that I'm not advocating for a visitor pattern--it's something I almost never use. But using instanceof instead of overriding methods is inexcusable. –  Kevin Jul 10 '12 at 14:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you know they're of the subclass type, then just cast them directly without an instanceof check.

But putting them in a superclass-typed array is telling the compiler to discard the information that they're actually of the subclass type. Either your superclass should expose those methods (perhaps as abstract), or your array should be of the subclass type (so you're not telling the compiler to forget the actual type of the objects), or you'll have to suck it up and do the cast (possibly with the instanceof test).

The only other notable alternative is that you might experiment with the visitor pattern, which passes an action to the object and lets the object decide what to do with it. That lets you override classes to ignore or perform the actions based on their runtime type.

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Yes - you can do it by inverting the flow: instead of your code doing something when the instance of the base class is of a specific type, pass an action item to the object, and let the object decide whether to perform it or not. This is the basic trick behind the Visitor Pattern.

interface DoSomething {
    void act();
}
abstract class AbstractBaseClass {
    abstract void performAction(DoSomething ds);
}
class FirstSubclass extends AbstractBaseClass {
    public void performAction(DoSomething ds) {
        ds.act();
    }
}
class SecondSubclass extends AbstractBaseClass {
    public void performAction(DoSomething ds) {
        // Do nothing
    }
}

AbstractBaseClass array[] = new AbstractBaseClass[] {
    new FirstSubclass()
,   new FirstSubclass()
,   new SecondSubclass()
,   new FirstSubclass()
,   new SecondSubclass()
};
for (AbstractBaseClass b : array) {
    b.performAction(new DoSomething() {
        public void act() {
            System.out.println("Hello, I'm here!");
        }
    });
}
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This is my prefred way to go. Unfortunately, I can't add methods to the subclasses because they are POJO without any functionality. –  user28061 Jul 10 '12 at 14:28
1  
@user28061 If your subclasses have no overrides, then your choices are quire limited: all the action will be confined to the code acting on your subclasses, so you will end up with an instanceof. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 10 '12 at 14:32
2  
Where did the whole notion come up that POJOs can't contain functionality? I've seen that in some other projects. Objects are intended to contain both data and behaviors. If they only contain data, they aren't pojos... they're beans –  corsiKa Jul 10 '12 at 17:15

You can try to use the Visitor design pattern. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visitor_pattern

You have to ask yourself, why do you need to know their type, maybe this can be replaced with the use of an abstract method in the super class, that every one of them can implement according the desired result.

abstract class A{
    abstract void visit();
}

class B extends A{
    void visit() { print("B"); }
}

class C extends A {
    void visit() { print("C"); }
}
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I would avoid casting them in the first place.

Really think about what you're trying to do, and if they should be in the same collection like that.

If you have something like this

for(MyObj o : array) {
   if(o instanceof A) {
      ((A)o).doA();
   }
   if(o instanceof B) {
      ((B)o).doB();
   }
}

consider this instead

abstract class MyObj {
    abstract void doIt();
}

class A {
    void doIt() { doA(); }
}

class B {
    void doIt() { doB(); }
}
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Expose the method in the superclass, and then use overriding. Provide an empty implementation in the base class so that subclasses can ignore the action if needed.

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