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I came about something rather baffling in C# just recently. In our code base, we have a TreeNode class. When changing some code, I found that it was impossible to assign a variable to the Nodes property. On closer inspection it became clear that the property is read-only and this behavior is to be expected.

What is strange is that our code base had until then always relied on assignment of some anonymous type to the Nodes property and compiled and worked perfectly.

To summarize: why did the assignment in AddSomeNodes work in the first place?

using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ReadOnlyProperty
{
    public class TreeNode
    {
        private readonly IList<TreeNode> _nodes = new List<TreeNode>();

        public IList<TreeNode> Nodes
        {
            get { return _nodes;  }
        }
    }

    public class TreeBuilder
    {
        public IEnumerable<TreeNode> AddSomeNodes()
        {
            yield return new TreeNode
             {
                Nodes = { new TreeNode() }
             };
        }

        public IEnumerable<TreeNode> AddSomeOtherNodes()
        {
            var someNodes = new List<TreeNode>();

            yield return new TreeNode
             {
                Nodes = someNodes
             };
        }
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

AddSomeNodes is not creating an instance of List<TreeNode> because that syntax is a collection initializer (therefore it is not assigning to Nodes meaning it doesn't break the readonly contract), the compiler actually translates the collection initializer into calls to .Add.

The AddSomeOtherNodes call actually tries to re-assign the value, but it is readonly. This is also the object initializer syntax, which translates into simple property calls. This property does not have a setter, so that call generates a compiler error. Attempting to add a setter that sets the readonly value will generate another compiler error because it is marked readonly.

From MSDN:

By using a collection initializer you do not have to specify multiple calls to the Add method of the class in your source code; the compiler adds the calls.

Also, just to clarify, there are no anonymous types in play in your code - it is all initializer syntax.


Unrelated to your question, but in the same area.

Interestingly, the Nodes = { new TreeNode() } syntax doesn't work with a local member, it only seems to work when it is nested inside an object initializer or during object assignment:

List<int> numbers = { 1, 2, 3, 4 }; // This isn't valid.
List<int> numbers = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4 }; // Valid.

// This is valid, but will NullReferenceException on Numbers
// if NumberContainer doesn't "new" the list internally.
var container = new NumberContainer()  
{
    Numbers = { 1, 2, 3, 4 }
};

The MSDN documentation doesn't seem to have any clarification on this.

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@Downvoter Why the downvote? My observation about the OPs situation is accurate according to the documentation and my own testing. Not to mention all of the other answers. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 10 '12 at 14:28
    
I just got a down vote as well! –  MBen Jul 10 '12 at 15:20
    
Thanks for providing such a complete and concise answer so quickly! You are completely right that I made a mistake in calling it an anonymous type. This behavior makes sense when considering it is collection initialization syntax, not assignment of an anonymous type. It is sometimes difficult to disambiguate these concepts mentally because they are so syntactically alike. Thanks! –  Michiel Jul 10 '12 at 15:20
    
@MBen On this answer? My screen tells me you haven't. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 10 '12 at 15:21
    
Yes on my answer, I just had 2, two minutes after it went back to 1, however I can't see it on my screen either... weird.. well next time :) –  MBen Jul 10 '12 at 15:23

Your nodes property is not being assigned.

Using the special collection initializer:

CollectionProperty = { a, b, c };

Is changed to:

CollectionProperty.Add(a);
CollectionProperty.Add(b);
CollectionProperty.Add(c);
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This is not assigning it is adding an element to the ICollection

 Nodes = {new TreeNode() }, that is why it works.
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I compiled your code (after removing the AddSomeOtherNodes method) and opened it in Reflector and here is the result:

public IEnumerable<TreeNode> AddSomeNodes()
{
    TreeNode iteratorVariable0 = new TreeNode();
    iteratorVariable0.Nodes.Add(new TreeNode());
    yield return iteratorVariable0;
}

As you can see, with this syntax the Add method is called on the Nodes variable.

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The compiler equivalent to what happened is this:

public IEnumerable<TreeNode> AddSomeNodes()
{
    TreeNode node = new TreeNode();
    node.Nodes.Add(new TreeNode());

    yield return node;
}

The important distinction here is that they used the collection initializer syntax to assign the value.

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