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Suppose I have a Base & Derived class:

class Base{
 private:
  int* _privateIntPtrB;
 protected:
  int* _protectedIntPtrB;
 public:
  //methods which use
  //_privateIntPtrB and _protectedIntPtrB

class Derived: public Base{
 private:
  int* _privateIntPtrD;
 protected:
  int* _protectedIntPtrB; //I am redeclaring this var
 public:
  //methods which use
  //_privateIntPtrD and _protectedIntPtrB

My question: In the methods of the Derived class, does the Derived version of _protectedIntPtrB get used? (I think it does, but want to confirm).

If a method is not redefined by the Derived class, which version of the _protectedIntPtrB will be used by a pointer to Derived class?

The reason I am asking - I want to initialize _protectedIntPtrB in the Derived class differently and want that version of the _protectedIntPtrB to be used in all the instances of Derived class.

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3  
Can't you just reuse the original one and assign it a different value in its constructor? –  Wug Jul 10 '12 at 14:19
1  
I always find questions of this kind hard to answer, despite doing C++ for over a decade now. Simply because the "correct" answer is to give whoever is attempting this a good hard slap: "I don't care what happens if you do this, just don't do it! :-D (See Wug's comment.) –  DevSolar Jul 10 '12 at 14:20
    
It will use the one in the Derived class, but if you "want that version of the _protectedIntPtrB to be used in all instances of the Derived class" - do you mean static? –  user195488 Jul 10 '12 at 14:23
    
Just avoid protected attributes entirely and you'll save yourself a ton of debugging time figuring out why your invariants are being violated. –  Mark B Jul 10 '12 at 14:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the methods of the Derived class, does the Derived version of _protectedIntPtrB get used?

Yes, it hides the base class member and so an unqualified use of _protectedIntPtrB in the scope of Derived refers to Derived::_protectedIntPtrB. (The base class variable is still available, if qualified as Base::_protectedIntPtrB).

If a method is not redefined by the Derived class, which version of the _protectedIntPtrB will be used by a pointer to Derived class?

The base-class variable. Data members of derived classes are not available from the base class.

The reason I am asking - I want to initialize _protectedIntPtrB in the Derived class differently and want that version of the _protectedIntPtrB to be used in all the instances of Derived class.

Usually, the best way to make derived classes behave differently to their base classes is by overriding virtual functions. It would probably be better if you had a think about exactly what you want to achieve: work out what behaviour you want to modify, and encapsulate that in a virtual function.

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Thanks for re-enforcing the 2nd point. –  armundle Jul 10 '12 at 14:56

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