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I'm designing a class that has a std::vector as an instance variable. I'm using a std::vector because I need to set its size at runtime. Here are the relevant portions of my code:

my_class.h:

#include <vector>
using std::vector;
class MyClass {
    int size;
    vector<int> vec;
}

my_class.cc:

#include "my_class.h"
using std::vector
MyClass::MyClass(int m_size) : size(m_size) {
     vec = new vector<int>(size,0);
}

When I attempt to compile I get these error messages:

g++ -c -Wall my_class.cc -o my_class.o

my_class.cc: In constructor ‘MyClass::MyClass(int):

my_class.cc:4 error: no match for ‘operator=’ in ‘((MyClass*)this)->My_Class::vec = ((*(const allocator_type*)(& std::allocator())), (operator new(24u), (, ((std::vector*)))))’

make: * [my_class.o] Error 1

However, when I change the offending line to:

vector<int> temp(size,0);
vec = temp;

It now compiles without a hitch and I get the desired behaviour and can access my vector as

vec[i]  // i having been defined as an int yada yada yada

This workaround is okay, but I would like to understand why it works and the first method fails. Thanks in advance.

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new vector returns a pointer not a value, for you to be able to assign it to your member variable vec –  Chethan Jul 10 '12 at 14:33
1  
My guess is you come from Java or C# and if so, my serious advice is to get a good, introductory C++ book first. –  phresnel Jul 10 '12 at 15:11
    
And please always post actual code via the copy+paste method. The code you posted is incomplete –  phresnel Jul 10 '12 at 15:11
1  
Aside: do you really need the size member? Recall that vectors carry around their own size, which can always be queried like so: vec.size(). –  Robᵩ Jul 10 '12 at 17:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Just do:

MyClass::MyClass(int m_size) : size(m_size), vec(m_size, 0)

You already seem to know about initializer lists, why not initialize vector there directly?

vec = new vector<int>(size,0);

is illegal because new returns a pointer and in your case vec is an object.

Your second option:

vector<int> temp(size,0);
vec = temp;

although it compiles, does extra work for no gain. By the time you reach the assignment, two vectors would already have been constructed and discarded afterwards.

share|improve this answer
1  
IIRC this will cause warnings with GCC because of the order of initialization - you should order the initializations in initializer list the same way as member variables in the class. –  Fiktik Jul 10 '12 at 14:33
    
Thanks for the comment, based on it I tried doing vec = *(new vector<int>(szie,0)); and that also worked, but I will use initializer list thank you! –  fenkerbb Jul 10 '12 at 14:34
    
@user1269950 what you did is wrong - it creates a memory leak. new allocates a memory on the heap, creates an object there and returns a pointer to it. What you did was assign the contents of that object to your member object and then forget about the original one - but it still remains allocated forever. When you call new you always must save the address it returns (in a pointer) and eventually call delete on that pointer! –  Fiktik Jul 10 '12 at 14:43
    
@user1269950 no, don't do *(new...). Memory leak. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 10 '12 at 14:50

The use of vector is legal in your class, the problem is how you initialize it:

#include <vector>

class MyClass {
public:
    MyClass(int m_size);

    // ... more things...
private:
    int size;
    vector<int> vec;
}

You are assigning a pointer to a new vector object, as if this vector object was not initialized.

vec = new vector<int>(size,0);

If you really want this to work, then you should declare your vec object as:

vector<int> * vec;

And don't forget to add a destructor:

MyClass::~MyClass {
    delete vec;
}

Why did it work when you dropped the new particle? Because you are creating a new object vector, and overwriting the one in your class (this does not guarantee the original one to be correctly eliminated, however).

You actually don't need to do that. Your vector object is already initialized (its default constructor called) when you've reached the constructor of MyClass. If you just want to be sure that memory is reserved for size items:

MyClass::MyClass(int m_size): size(m_size) {
    vec.reserve( size );
}

If you want your vector to have size elements, then:

MyClass::MyClass(int m_size): size(m_size), vec(m_size, 0)
    {}

Finally, as one of the commenters points out, size is not actually needed once the vector has been constructed. So you can get rid of the size member:

class MyClass {
public:
    MyClass(int m_size): vec(m_size, 0)
        {}

    unsigned int getSize() const
        { return vec.size(); }

    // ... more things...
private:
    vector<int> vec;
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
@OP -- The vector knows its size, so if all size is doing is keeping track of the number of elements in vector, then suggest you get rid of size. –  Happy Green Kid Naps Jul 10 '12 at 15:00
    
Very true, I'll modify my answer to involve your comment. –  Baltasarq Jul 10 '12 at 18:59

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