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I have a file which looks like this:

893     990     1000    1020    1500    1655 
  0/1   1/1     0/1     .       1/0     .
  .     0/1     .       1/1     1/0     .      
  .     .       1/1     0/1     1/0     1/0

How do I add two columns with different values so that the output can look like this:

ID      Population      893     990     1000    1020    1500    1655 
AD0062  pop1      0/1   1/1     0/1     .       1/0     .
AD0063  pop1      .     0/1     .       1/1     1/0     .      
AD0074  pop1      .     .       1/1     0/1     1/0     1/0

Any hints? Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

awk '{print "ID\tPopulation\t"$0}' input_file

This is given that ID and Population are fixed.

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Hi Kari, I'm afraid I don't understand...where in the code would I be able to specify the individual ID numbers? (i.e. AD0062, AD0063, AD0074, etc.) –  714 Jul 10 '12 at 14:58
    
@DanicaFabrigar Sorry, I missed that part. How do you know which line should have which ID? –  Karl Nordström Jul 10 '12 at 15:00
    
The start of each row would have their own ID...as in the first row is simply the header column (e.g. ID, Population, 893), the subsequent rows are data for each individual –  714 Jul 10 '12 at 15:04
    
@DanicaFabrigar, I understood that now, but how do you know which ID and Population code to give each line? –  Karl Nordström Jul 10 '12 at 15:17
    
The population ID is fixed (pop1) but the individual ID are unique tags(there are 16 individuals in total: AD0062,AD0063,AD0065,AD0074,AD0075,AD0076,AD0077,AD0078,AD0082,AD0083,AD0087,AD0‌​091,AD0092,AD0098,AD0099,AD0100) –  714 Jul 10 '12 at 15:22

Based in the previous answer of Karl Nordström and the comment adding the IDs, I hope this awk program can do the job:

Content of infile:

893     990     1000    1020    1500    1655 
  0/1   1/1     0/1     .       1/0     .
  .     0/1     .       1/1     1/0     .      
  .     .       1/1     0/1     1/0     1/0

Content of script.awk:

BEGIN {
    population = "pop1"
    id = "AD0062,AD0063,AD0065,AD0074,AD0075,AD0076,AD0077,AD0078,AD0082,\
          AD0083,AD0087,AD0091,AD0092,AD0098,AD0099,AD0100"
    split( id, id_arr, /,/ )

    OFS = "\t"
}

FNR == 1 { 
    printf "%s\t%s\t%s\n", "ID", "Population", $0
    next
}

FNR > 1 { 
    printf "%s\t%s\t%s\n", id_arr[ FNR - 1 ], population, $0
}

Run it like:

awk -f script.awk infile

With following output:

ID      Population      893     990     1000    1020    1500    1655 
AD0062  pop1      0/1   1/1     0/1     .       1/0     .
AD0063  pop1      .     0/1     .       1/1     1/0     .      
AD0065  pop1      .     .       1/1     0/1     1/0     1/0
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