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I created a javascript class, and I would like to call a method inside every second, here is my code:

var MyClass = Base.extend({
    myMethod: function() {
        setTimeout(function(){
            var mc = new MyClass();
            mc.myMethod();
        }, 1000);
    }
});
var myGlobalClass = new MyClass();

myGlobalClass.myMethod();

Actually this code works, but I need to do a new MyClass() every time.
I would had liked using myGlobalClass.

Is this possible ?

Just a precision this.myMethod() can't work in this case, if you thought of that.

Thanks for your help

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to reffer to the value myGlobalClass then you can just do so directly from the function

setTimeout(function(){
  myGlobalClass.myMethod();
}, 1000);

This works because Javascript doesn't just look for locals defined in the current scope when resolving names. It looks at all of the parent scopes as well to resolve them. In this case myGlobalClass is defined in the global scope. Name resolution begins in the setTimeout function callback and it won't find it in the function, it will then search myMethod: function() { and won't find it there, it will then look in the global scope and discover myGlobalClass. It will resolve the name to this value

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first time i've ever heard an anonymous function in javascript called a lambda. interesting thought. –  jbabey Jul 10 '12 at 15:01
    
Oh... I did that id didn't work I thought I needed to do something else, I tried again and this time it works... I'm a bit ashamed cause it's logic. Thanks for your reply (I'll accept it in 10min) –  Shadowbob Jul 10 '12 at 15:02
    
@jbabey i changed my answer to remove references to lambda to avoid confusion with the proposed lambda feature of the upcoming ECMA version –  JaredPar Jul 10 '12 at 15:04

Instead of using setTimeout to call method recursively. You could use setInterval, which make your code more clear.

    var MyClass = Base.extend({
        myMethod: function() {
           //..
        }
    });
   var myGlobalClass = new MyClass();
   setInterval(myGlobalClass.myMethod, 1000);
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If you want to repeat an action every second, have you thought about using setInterval instead of setTimeout? Then myMethod wouldn't have to initalize the timeout on every call.

You could just do this:

var MyClass = Base.extend({
    myMethod: function() {
        // do stuff here
    }
});

var myGlobalClass = new MyClass();

setInterval(myGlobalClass.myMethod, 1000);
share|improve this answer
    
Ok I never searched for the difference, here I don't need an absolute precision but thank you for making me search at least I know where my old time bugs came from when I did this kind of things ;-) –  Shadowbob Jul 10 '12 at 15:09

If you have several instances, give the function a name and call it recursively.

myMethod: function myMethod() {
    setTimeout(function(){
        myMethod();
    }, 1000);
}

This is buggy on IE8-.

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In my opinion, going with multiple instances is a bad idea in general. It's quite simple to fix so you only need one instance. –  Jon Jul 10 '12 at 15:02
    
@Jon: But why is he then using new and all? If there is only one instance, I would just go with a plain object. –  pimvdb Jul 10 '12 at 15:02
    
He has to create at least one instance to have a reference to the method. But once he has a reference, there is no need to make a new one. In fact, he doesn't even need one reference as @JaredPar's answer shows. –  Jon Jul 10 '12 at 15:04
    
Interesting I didn't know we could do this, but the answer of +JaredPar did it –  Shadowbob Jul 10 '12 at 15:06

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