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I have the following struct:

struct elem {
  int number;
  char character;
};

struct item {
  struct elem element;
};

and the following function:

void init(struct item *wrapper) {
  assert(wrapper != NULL);
  wrapper->element = NULL;
}

item->element = NULL yields a incompatible types in assignment. Why is that? Shouldn't setting a struct to NULL be okay?

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1  
Only pointers can be set to NULL. You're trying to null an object. –  Mysticial Jul 10 '12 at 15:10
2  
Maybe you want to memset it to 0 instead ? –  cnicutar Jul 10 '12 at 15:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In C NULL is generally defined as the following

#define NULL ((void*)0)

This means that it's a pointer value. In this case your attempting to assign a pointer (NULL) to a non-pointer value item::element and getting the appropriate message. It seems like your intent is to have element be a pointer here so try the following

struct item {
  struct elem* element;
};
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Regarding main, I am not using it. I just didnt know what to name the struct for the question here. I'll rename it here though. –  Nayefc Jul 10 '12 at 15:24
    
But init takes a pointer. wrapper is a pointer to that struct so I should be able to set it to NULL using ->. No? –  Nayefc Jul 10 '12 at 15:27
    
@Darksky even though you have a pointer to main the element field inside of main is still a non-pointer type. –  JaredPar Jul 10 '12 at 15:28

NULL is a pointer value, wrapper->element is not a pointer, therefore you cannot assign it NULL

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But init takes a pointer. wrapper is a pointer to that struct so I should be able to set it to NULL using ->. No? –  Nayefc Jul 10 '12 at 15:28
    
@Darksky the outer object is a pointer, but the struct's member object is not a pointer. Regardless if the wrapper object is a pointer, passed by value, or (in C++ case) a reference, it does not change the members' types to match –  Dan F Jul 10 '12 at 15:29
  1. element is not a pointer and hence cannot be assigned NULL.
  2. main->element is wrong usage. You cannot access a structure's element using it's name. It should be wrapper->element. You should access it using the variable name.
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+1 for catching an important flaw. It shouldn't be main, but wrapper. –  ArjunShankar Jul 10 '12 at 15:16
    
2. That was a typo. Obviously.. Otherwise the error would be different. –  Nayefc Jul 10 '12 at 15:25

In addition to the previous answers, sometimes it makes sense to create a NULL struct. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Null_Object_pattern

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