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Consider the following: I have a class CDevices containing, amongst others, a string member

class CDevice
{
public:
   CDevice(void);
   ~CDevice(void);

   // device name
   std::string Device_Name;
   etc...
}

and somewhere else in my code I define another class that contains a vector of pointers to CDevices

class CDevice;
class CServers
{
public:
   CServers(void);
   ~CServers(void);

   // Devices vector
   vector<CDevice*> Devices;
   etc...
}

The problem appears in the following lines in my main.c

pDevice = new CDevice;

pDevice->Device_Name = "de";
Devices.push_back(pDevice);

pDevice->Device_Name = " revolotiunibus";
Devices.push_back(pDevice);

pDevice->Device_Name = " orbium";
Devices.push_back(pDevice);

pDevice->Device_Name = " coelestium";
Devices.push_back(pDevice);

for(int i = 0; i < (int)Devices.size(); ++i)
    cout << "\nLoad name = " << Devices.at(i)->Device_Name << endl;

The output I get is " coelestium" repeated four times: each time I push_back a new element into the vector all of the already existing elements take the value of the one which has just been added. I have also tried using iterators to recover each element in the vector with the same results. Could someone please tell me what's wrong here?

Thankx

share|improve this question

The problem is that you only make one instance of CDevice. Every time you push back, you're pushing back a pointer to the same one instance.

And every time you update pDevice->Device_Name you're changing the Device_Name of that one device. So in effect you have four pointers to the same thing. And the thing your pointing to is taking the last name you assigned to it.

You need to make a new CDevice for every push_back.

In addition, you then need to consider who owns each of these new CDevice instances. Is it your CServers class? If so, then when CServers is deleted it will need to delete each CDevice that has been instantiated. You can get this for behaviour for free by replacing your vector of pointers:

std::vector<CDevice*>

with a vector of smart pointers. For instance:

std::vector<boost::unique_ptr<CDevice> >

share|improve this answer

You push pointer in vector and then change Device_Name field.

void push_back ( const T& x );

Since you work with pointer, push_back function copy your pointer and push it in vector, function not copy element on which pointer refer, so, one pointer pushed in vector in your code 4 times.

share|improve this answer

You are pushing the same instance onto the vector, and then resetting the string of that instance.

If you want a different object in the vector, you have to create a new one:

pDevice = new CDevice;
pDevice->Device_Name = "de";
Devices.push_back(pDevice);

pDevice2 = new CDevice;
pDevice2->Device_Name = " revolotiunibus";
Devices.push_back(pDevice2);

// ...

Your example is just resetting the string in the same object, over and over, and pushing the same pointer onto the vector 4 times.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you guys, you are the best! – Jose Manuel Albornoz Jul 11 '12 at 10:42

You're assigning the device name four times but each time to the Device_Name member of the one-and-only CDevice instance you have. In the end, the Device_Name member of the one-and-only CDevice instance has the last value you assigned, " coelestium".

If you need four CDevices you'll have to create four of them:

pDevice1 = new CDevice;
pDevice1->Device_Name = "de";

pDevice2 = new CDevice;
pDevice2->Device_Name = " revolotiunibus";

....
share|improve this answer

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