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I'm in the process of rewriting an overengineered and unmaintainable chunk of my company's library code that interfaces between C# and C++. I've started looking into P/Invoke, but it seems like there's not much in the way of accessible help.

We're passing a struct that contains various parameters and settings down to unmanaged codes, so we're defining identical structs. We don't need to change any of those parameters on the C++ side, but we do need to access them after the P/Invoked function has returned.

My questions are:

  1. What is the best way to pass strings? Some are short (device id's which can be set by us), and some are file paths (which may contain Asian characters)
  2. Should I pass an IntPtr to the C# struct or should I just let the Marshaller take care of it by putting the struct type in the function signature?
  3. Should I be worried about any non-pointer datatypes like bools or enums (in other, related structs)? We have the treat warnings as errors flag set in C++ so we can't use the Microsoft extension for enums to force a datatype.
  4. Is P/Invoke actually the way to go? There was some Microsoft documentation about Implicit P/Invoke that said it was more type-safe and performant.

For reference, here is one of the pairs of structs I've written so far:

C++

/**
    Struct used for marshalling Scan parameters from managed to unmanaged code.
*/
struct ScanParameters
{
    LPSTR deviceID;
    LPSTR spdClock;
    LPSTR spdStartTrigger;
    double spinRpm;
    double startRadius;
    double endRadius;
    double trackSpacing;
    UINT64 numTracks;
    UINT32 nominalSampleCount;
    double gainLimit;
    double sampleRate;
    double scanHeight;
    LPWSTR qmoPath; //includes filename
    LPWSTR qzpPath; //includes filename
};

C#

/// <summary>
/// Struct used for marshalling scan parameters between managed and unmanaged code.
/// </summary>
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct ScanParameters
{
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]
    public string deviceID;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]
    public string spdClock;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]
    public string spdStartTrigger;
    public Double spinRpm;
    public Double startRadius;
    public Double endRadius;
    public Double trackSpacing;
    public UInt64 numTracks;
    public UInt32 nominalSampleCount;
    public Double gainLimit;
    public Double sampleRate;
    public Double scanHeight;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)]
    public string qmoPath;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)]
    public string qzpPath;
}
share|improve this question
    
What exactly is not working. Using terms non-bittable is strange, because the structure you list, certainly be turned into a byte array. I would define the length of each field in the structure. –  Ramhound Jul 10 '12 at 15:25
    
I'm more looking for the correct design patterns for using P/Invoke. I thought anything with pointers is non-blittable? –  Greggo Jul 10 '12 at 15:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A blittable type is a type that has a common representation between managed and unmanaged code and can therefore be passed between them with little or no problem, e.g. byte, int32, etc.

A non-blittable type does not have the common representation, e.g. System.Array, System.String, System.Boolean, etc.

By specifying the MarshalAs attribute for a non-blittable type you can tell the marshaller what it should be converted to. See this article on Blittable and Non-Blittable Types for more information

1 - What is the best way to pass strings? Some are short (device id's which can be set by us), and some are file paths (which may contain Asian characters)

StringBuilder is generally recommended as the easiest to use but I often use plain byte arrays.

2 - Should I pass an IntPtr to the C# struct or should I just let the Marshaller take care of it by putting the struct type in the function signature?

If the method is expecting a pointer then pass an IntPtr although you can get probably away with a ref in many cases depending on what it's going to be used for. If it's something that needs to stick around in the same place for a long time then I would manually allocate the memory with Marshal and pass the resulting IntPtr.

3 - Should I be worried about any non-pointer datatypes like bools or enums (in other, related structs)? We have the treat warnings as errors flag set in C++ so we can't use the Microsoft extension for enums to force a datatype.

Once you've got everything set up with the correct marshalling attributes I don't see why you'd need to worry. If in doubt put in the attribute, if the struct only ever gets used by managed code then the attribute won't be used.

4 - Is P/Invoke actually the way to go? There was some Microsoft documentation about Implicit P/Invoke that said it was more type-safe and performant.

Can't comment on this, you're into Visual C++ territory there.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would you use byte arrays over the marshalling attributes? How would you go about doing this? Oh, my function signatures should have ref in front of the struct type? Do I need that for delegates/callbacks that I'm passing down? –  Greggo Jul 10 '12 at 17:44
    
What I usually do is if the method is expecting a pointer to something then I use Marshal.AllocHGlobal() to allocate an appropriately sized block of memory and then pass the IntPtr for it to the method. Then use Marshal.Copy() or Marshal.PtrToStructure() to retrieve the data. I just find that often it's quicker for me to do this than to spend time fiddling with Marshalling managed types. For callbacks, you don't need to pass the delegates using pointers unless again the method explicitly expects a pointer to a function pointer. –  Nanhydrin Jul 11 '12 at 8:08
    
For method signatures ref and IntPtr are to some extent interchangeable. So when trying to work out a p/invoke method signature you can first try using ref with the struct type and if that doesn't work, or as previously stated if the memory pointer needs to stay in the same place for a long time, then you would try an IntPtr instead of ref struct. –  Nanhydrin Jul 11 '12 at 8:10

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