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I have this code to read integers from a file. I used the same code to read doubles from another file and worked perfectly, but this time the looping is getting infinite. What could be? The file i'm reading was written by a program, could be it? I don't know what does this mean but my OS says that the file is binary. Well, any help will be appreciated. Thanks.

i=1;
cadeia = malloc ( i * sizeof(int) );
if (!cadeia){ //Avalia se a alocação de memória foi bem sucedida
  printf("Problema na alocação de memória para cadeia.");
  exit(0);
}
while ( !feof( arq_cadeia ) ){ /*Fazendo leitura e alocação de memória da matriz de transição*/
   fscanf ( arq_cadeia , "%d" , ( cadeia+i-1 ) );
   i++;
   cadeia = realloc ( cadeia , i * sizeof( int ) );
   if (!cadeia){ //Avalia se a alocação de memória foi bem sucedida
  printf("Problema na alocação de memória para cadeia.");
  exit(0);
   }
   printf("%d\n", *( cadeia+i-1 ));
}
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1  
You need to check the result of fscanf and make sure it is equal to 1. –  Paul R Jul 10 '12 at 15:38
4  
Concerning while ( !feof( arq_cadeia ) ), note that feof only becomes true after you tried to read past the end of file. In your loop, check the return value of fscanf, if it encounters invalid input, that remains in the stream and all subsequent scans fail. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 10 '12 at 15:38
    
Unrelated to your problem here, but you should probably consider allocating your buffer in larger increments, preallocate a chunk, if you need more then do a realloc in a chunk. –  pstrjds Jul 10 '12 at 15:39
    
Not related but: All files are binary. In fact, everything on a computer that is not hardware, is binary. Also please next time format your code in a more readable manner. –  m0skit0 Jul 10 '12 at 15:40
1  
@m0, I think you're confusing the issue here: If his "OS" says the file is "binary", it's not just telling him that it's stored on a computer. "Binary" here means "not text". –  alexis Jul 10 '12 at 15:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your hunch is right, if your file is in binary format scanf can't read it. If you can't see the numbers with a text editor (e.g., Notepad), scanf can't read them either.

Your program has other problems, by the way: It's terribly inefficient to realloc your entire array every time you read a number! The simplest thing would be to allocate so much space that you won't need it all (don't worry about the "waste", as long as you don't go way over the top). Second simplest is to measure the size of the file (you'll need stat or some such) and estimate the number of integers in it. Third simplest, allocate enough for 10000 integers, and carefully check when you're about to run out and allocate twice as much as you already had.

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Very nice! Thank you very much for you help. –  Rodolfo Jul 10 '12 at 16:21

You are reading integers assuming they are written in text mode. Check whether the file is a text file or whether it is a binary one, as you suspect. If you can open it with a text editor and read the contents, then it is a text file. Otherwise, you need to adjust the program in order to read binary files.

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As I said in the comments: all files are binary. What changes is the access mode, not the file. –  m0skit0 Jul 10 '12 at 15:42
    
Nice, thanks!!! –  Rodolfo Jul 10 '12 at 16:21

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