Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I found this code and it is the perfect solution for my problem but i just found out it won't work in ie9. Does anyone know how to re-write this code to work in IE9? here is the javascript code for it.

function showonlyonev2(thechosenone) {
    var newboxes = document.getElementsByTagName("div");
    for (var x = 0; x < newboxes.length; x++) {
        name = newboxes[x].getAttribute("class");
        if (name == 'newboxes-2') {
            if (newboxes[x].id == thechosenone) {
                if (newboxes[x].style.display == 'block') {
                    newboxes[x].style.display = 'none';
                }
                else {
                    newboxes[x].style.display = 'block';
                }
            } else {
                newboxes[x].style.display = 'none';
            }
        }
    }
}

I ran it in jsFiddle and got this error: Problem at line 4 character 9: Read only.

name = newboxes[x].getAttribute("class");

also here is the HTML part (short Version removed the head and body tags):

<table>
   <tr>
      <td>
         <div style="border: 1px solid blue; background-color: #99CCFF; padding: 5px; width: 150px;">
            <a id="myHeader1" href="javascript:showonlyone('newboxes1');" >show this one only</a>
         </div>
         <div class="newboxes" id="newboxes1" style="border: 1px solid black; background-color: #CCCCCC; display: block;padding: 5px; width: 150px;">Div #1</div>
      </td>
      <td>
         <div style="border: 1px solid blue; background-color: #99CCFF; padding: 5px; width: 150px;">
            <a id="myHeader2" href="javascript:showonlyone('newboxes2');" >show this one only</a>
         </div>
         <div class="newboxes" id="newboxes2" style="border: 1px solid black; background-color: #CCCCCC; display: none;padding: 5px; width: 150px;">Div #2</div>
      </td>
      <td>
         <div style="border: 1px solid blue; background-color: #99CCFF; padding: 5px; width: 150px;">
            <a id="myHeader3" href="javascript:showonlyone('newboxes3');" >show this one only</a>
         </div>
         <div class="newboxes" id="newboxes3" style="border: 1px solid black; background-color: #CCCCCC; display: none;padding: 5px; width: 150px;">Div #3</div>
      </td>
   </tr>
</table>

here is my jsFiddle view http://jsfiddle.net/Nuker_Viper/JvLDx/13/

share|improve this question
6  
First, don't just post a block of code. Tell us what you expect it to do and what you're actually seeing. Second, that's javascript, not java. I'm fixing the tag for you. –  bdares Jul 10 '12 at 15:54

1 Answer 1

Your edit makes the question clearer:

I ran it in jsFiddle and got this error: Problem at line 4 character 9: Read only.

name = newboxes[x].getAttribute("class");

You haven't declared name anywhere, so you're using name in some containing scope (probably global scope, e.g., window.name). Apparently IE9 considers that a read-only property, although I can't find any docs to support that.

In any case, you don't want to be mucking about with someone else's variable. Put var name; at the top of your function so you're using your own variable. :-)


Original answer when we had to guess at what was going wrong:

IE has a long-standing bug where it thinks the class attribute is called className, even in getAttribute. IE9 continues this bug in the misnamed "compatibility" mode. In standards mode, it gets it right.

The best thing to do is to avoid the issue entirely, since there's no need to use getAttribute for the class attribute; use the reflected property instead:

name = newboxes[x].className;
share|improve this answer
    
Is "reflected property" the correct terminology for this sort of thing? I thought it was an expando type.. uh.. thing. –  asawyer Jul 10 '12 at 15:56
1  
@asawyer: It's the usual term for this. Really, just "property" is sufficient and probably better. className, htmlFor, id, type, value, etc., are not expandos. Expandos are arbitrary properties you add to an element, whereas elements always have these properties defined by the spec (their values may be empty strings, but they have them). (Some of these properties have fairly complex definitions -- value, for instance -- others are basically just another way to access the attribute.) –  T.J. Crowder Jul 10 '12 at 16:01
    
That makes it very clear, thank you. –  asawyer Jul 10 '12 at 17:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.