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Why doesn't this work?

puts "Hi"

x = "stop"

loop do
  a = STDIN.gets
  break if a.to_s.downcase.equal?x.to_s
end

puts "bye"
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You don't need to use to_s for a.to_s or x.to_s as both are Strings and will always be, even when read from the keyboard. –  the Tin Man Jul 10 '12 at 18:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because gets will include the Enter key used at the end of whatever you type into it.

a = gets # I type in "stop"
a == "stop\n" #=> true

In order to fix this, chop off the newline

puts "Hi"

x = "stop"

loop do
  a = STDIN.gets.chop
  break if a.to_s.downcase == x.to_s
end

puts "bye"
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Thanks a lot!!! –  Srathi00 Jul 15 '12 at 20:17

There are two reasons.

First equal? is a very strong form of equality: by default it's equivalent to comparing object ids, so two strings that have the same content but aren't the same object won't be equal. You probably want to use == instead

Secondly gets will include the newline that you typed which you can remove with chop or chomp

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