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I have a JavaScript object as follows.

var sampleData = {
    "studentsList": {
        "Student1": {
            "marks": "123",
            "grade": "B"
        },
        "Student2": {
            "marks": "144",
            "grade": "A"
        }
    }
};​

Now the user enters the name of a student, say Student1 and I need to get the details of that object.

I have two questions.

[1] How do I get the details of the entered student using JavaScript?

When I use sampleData.studendsList.valueOf("Student1") returns me the complete object. I just need the details of "Student1".

[2] Is this the correct way to do it? Or we should create an array of Students and that contains an property called "name" with value say Student1 ? If I go with this approach then I need to iterate through the entire array list to get the details of a student.

Which appraoch is better?

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1  
There are no Arrays present in the above code. A better way would be to structure it to use Arrays as they are the more natural structure here. –  user166390 Jul 10 '12 at 16:39
    
You don't really need to have a sampleData variable wrapping the array if you don't have any other sample data. You could just have var studentsList = {blah}. –  Will Jul 10 '12 at 16:39
    
@pst, In the above example, I don't have an array. But I can have an array of Students and name can be one attribute in that array. I think it is the best way to represent it, but performance wise, I'm not sure if that is the right approach to go by. –  Apps Jul 10 '12 at 16:43
    
@Apps O(n) is only generally applicable when n increases to "a non-small value". Unless there is a performance concern, represent the data as is best fit for the current problem. It is very easy to create a cross-lookup from an Array or to Sort object properties based on their corresponding values. –  user166390 Jul 10 '12 at 17:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

An array is usually the more natural way to store a list of items (like students). But there are tradeoffs. As structured (using objects), you can access any student by name in constant time:

sampleData.studentsList.Student1

Structuring with an array looks like this:

var sampleData = {
    "studentsList": [
        {
            "marks": "123",
            "grade": "B"
        },
        {
            "marks": "144",
            "grade": "A"
        }
    ]
};​

Access the nth student like this:

sampleData.studentsList[n]

If the index of the desired student is not known, then accessing a particular student (based on its details) is O(n) (because you'd need to iterate the entire array to find the correct item in the worst case).

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Yeah, that is what I thought... Thanks a lot everyone. –  Apps Jul 10 '12 at 16:44

sampleData.studentsList.Student1 OR sampleData.studentsList["Student1"]

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[1] Access the property by using the access via []. That way you can insert a variable there instead of just a hardcoded identifier.

var studentDetails = sampleData.studendsList[ "Student1" ];

[2] For fast access to a specific student, this the better approach imo. Any array would involve some kind of array scanning to access a specific details object.

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[1] given a student name stored in a javascript variable, let's call it studentName, you would access that student's details like so:

var studentData = sampleData.studentsList[studentName];

[2] the big determining factor when choosing between an array or an object is: what does the key mean? if the key is irrelevant or just numeric, it should be an array. in this case, the key is the name of a student, so having an object is definitely the better choice.

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EDIT... I just realized that you're just building the object in place (rather than having it as a String)... so in fact you can skip the parsing and just get to the object directly via..

sampleData.studentsList.Student1

If however you had that object in the exact shape you have it but as a String you'd need to JSON.parse it first like so...

 myObj = JSON.parse(yourString);

    myObj.studentsList.Student1
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1  
@am not i am, good point... I edited. –  Genia S. Jul 10 '12 at 16:40

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