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My data set consists of documents containing a field with an array of integers. When i'm counting on objects whose field contains elements from some range it seems that index scan performance decreases with higher values indexBounds (but the same amount of values scanned by the range).

Test data:

for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i++) db.foo.insert({tts:(function(){var val = [];for(var j = 0; j < 100; j++) {val[j] = j} return val;})()});
db.foo.ensureIndex({tts:1});

Queries:

> db.foo.find({tts:{$elemMatch:{$gte:10, $lte:10}}}).explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor tts_1",
    "isMultiKey" : true,
    "n" : 100000,
    "nscannedObjects" : 100000,
    "nscanned" : 100000,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 1,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 313,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "tts" : [
            [
                10,
                10
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "localhost:27017"
}
> db.foo.find({tts:{$elemMatch:{$gte:90, $lte:90}}}).explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor tts_1",
    "isMultiKey" : true,
    "n" : 100000,
    "nscannedObjects" : 100000,
    "nscanned" : 100000,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 1,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 1286,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "tts" : [
            [
                90,
                90
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "localhost:27017"
}

In fact I have near 200 values in this field and query gets up to 10 times slower when the requested range have the highest boundaries. (Each value in the field belongs to a unique range, all ranges select the same amount of objects (100000), querying is performed only for subranges of this ranges)

Collection stats:

> db.foo.stats()
{
    "ns" : "test.foo",
    "count" : 100000,
    "size" : 122400128,
    "avgObjSize" : 1224.00128,
    "storageSize" : 140763136,
    "numExtents" : 12,
    "nindexes" : 2,
    "lastExtentSize" : 40071168,
    "paddingFactor" : 1,
    "systemFlags" : 1,
    "userFlags" : 0,
    "totalIndexSize" : 254845920,
    "indexSizes" : {
        "_id_" : 3262224,
        "tts_1" : 251583696
    },
    "ok" : 1
}

Is there a workaround for this problem?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What version of MongoDB are you using ? –  Stennie Jul 11 '12 at 5:50
    
2.1.2/2.1.3-pre- –  Sergey Choister Jul 11 '12 at 7:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Mongo is able to use the index to determine that there is an element in each of the documents that matches the $lte and $gte conditions. $elemmatch requires that a single element match both conditions so mongo scans each of the documents (and the subarray) to determine whether such an element exists. For the larger values, mongo has to scan 90 elements into each array instead of just the first 10 to find a matching element. Thus a query the matches elements towards the end of a long array will take longer.

Note that if you reverse the array, the behavior is reversed:

for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i++) db.foo.insert({tts:(function(){var val = [];for(var j = 100; j >= 0; j--) {val[j] = j} return val;})()});

It looks like this might be related to https://jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-6002. Using the latest development release might fix the problem at the cost of stability.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems to be so, but looking at total number of indexed elements (10000000 = 100 * 100000) i thought that each array element is indexed as a separate value which should allow scan only over elements in the requested range as described in comments for link –  Sergey Choister Jul 11 '12 at 7:32
    
4180 appears to fix an issue with scanning too much of the index (wrong bounds) but doesn't seem to change the behavior with regard to checking each document for a single matching element. In your case, the index bounds are being selected correctly but they match every document in the collection so mongo still scans every document. If only a few documents matched the query at all, the performance hit should be negligible. –  narced133 Jul 11 '12 at 18:58
    
thank for your answers. It's still not clear for me why should mongo scan objects when all necessary elements found in index. Nevertheless to work it around i've just split my big array into smaller ones and saved them into separate fields. –  Sergey Choister Jul 13 '12 at 17:08

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