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I'd love to know the consensus design pattern for implementing the following:

I have a main view with 2 buttons allowing a user to perform different tasks, both requiring an image to be chosen using a UIImagePickerController (let's say task 1 = "choose/take photo of type foo" and task 2 = "choose/take photo of type bar"). At present I'm implementing the <UIImagePickerControllerDelegate> protocol in the view controller which presents the UIIPC, however given I need 2 different responses to the delegate method:

     - (void) imagePickerController: (UIImagePickerController *) pickerdidFinishPickingMediaWithInfo: (NSDictionary *) info

depending on whether the user chose a foo or bar photo I'm interested in the best way to implement the 2 different <UIImagePickerController> delegate methods. Would a standalone delegate object, included in the presenting view controller and instantiated twice work best? (I'm only a couple of weeks old on iOS so still embracing design patterns).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you create the pickers as properties in the header, you could make a comparisson between picker and yourPicker in the delegate method

- (void)imagePickerController:(UIImagePickerController *)picker didFinishPickingMediaWithInfo:(NSDictionary *)info
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Of course, I really should have thought of that myself. Not enough Pepsi Max I guess. Cheers. –  NSTJ Jul 10 '12 at 17:53

Declare two different delegates. Best way, Never instantiate the same delegate twice as it will end up in weird juju happening with your code.

In your UIImagePickerController.h write:

    #pragma mark - Protocols advance declarations 
    @protocol imageTypeADelegate
    @required
      -(void) takeImageOfTypeA:(id)object;
    @end

    #pragma mark - Protocols advance declarations 
    @protocol imageTypeBDelegate
    @required
       -(void) takeImageOfTypeB:(id)object;
    @end

add them to your property declarations as such

    #pragma mark - Property declarations 
    @property (assign) id <imageTypeADelegate> typeADelegate;
    @property (assign) id <imageTypeADelegate> typeBDelegate;

Then you on your .m file add:

    #pragma mark - Protocols
    -(void) pressedButtonToTakeImageOfTypeA:(id)sender;
    {
       [[self _typeADelegate] takeImageOfTypeA:(id)object];
    }
    -(void) pressedButtonToTakeImageOfTypeB:(id)sender;
    {
       [[self _typeBDelegate] takeImageOfTypeB:(id)object];
    }

Then on whatever class you need them to run a routine all you have to do is add this to the .h you want it to notify

    #import "UIImagePickerController.h"
    @interface OtherViewController : UIViewController <imageTypeADelegate, imageTypeBDelegate>

and on your .m somewhere

-(void) takeImageOfTypeA:(id)object;
{ 
   // Do something
}

-(void) takeImageOfTypeA:(id)object;
{
   // Do something
} 

/~End of Line

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Interesting. Do you think this is a superior design pattern to assigning the presenting view controller as the delegate and then switching on a property set at the time the UIIPC is presented? (I extended Javier's answer above a little to just set a BOOL to denote its type before presenting each picker). –  NSTJ Jul 10 '12 at 18:18
    
I believe that although the chosen answer is a much simpler and elegant method it has small but critical flaws.If you are running under a constrained environment the flag might give you a bad access. The method I described, yields a more stable runtime routine. But hey I am old-school and try to stream line the code through the least resistive path –  Im_Lp Jul 10 '12 at 18:36
    
Thanks - I chose Alejandro's answer because it solved my issue though I agree yours was correct in the context of delegation. SO not providing me with a divideAcceptanceBy2() method meant he ended up with the accept. Regardless, your answer shed a lot of light on delegation, cheers. –  NSTJ Jul 10 '12 at 18:47

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