Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do you check if classinstance has been created/initialised or is null?

private MyClass myclass;

if(!check class has been initialised)      //<- What would that check be?
    myclass = new MyClass();

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
1  
I note that you've tagged this question as involving ASP.Net. Is there some additional trickiness to this question because of that fact? –  dlev Jul 10 '12 at 17:56
    
is this homework ? if so please retag it as such –  Micah Armantrout Jul 10 '12 at 17:57
    
@MicahArmantrout No, I just used myclass.Equals(null) which threw an exception, but I didn't try the simple ==. –  James Jul 10 '12 at 17:59
    
Normally one would do ==. Another possibility is Equals(myclass, null). Note that it's the static version of Equals which has two arguments. There's also ReferenceEquals. If you haven't done anything to change the meaning of == or of Equals, then for MyClass, all these three are equivalent (for a class type). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 10 '12 at 18:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Just check if it is null

if (myclass == null)

As mentioned in your comment,

if (myclass.Equals(null)) 

will not work because if myclass is null, that's translated to

if (null.Equals(null))

which leads to a NullReferenceException.

By the way, objects declared in class scope are automatically initialized to null by the compiler, so your line:

private MyClass myclass;

is the same as

private MyClass myclass = null;

Objects declared in a method are forced to be assigned some initial value (even if that initial value is null).

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah that works, thanks. I used myclass.Equals(null) which didn't work. –  James Jul 10 '12 at 17:55
1  
Correct. It did not work because myclass was null, and null.Equals(null) should give a NullReferenceException :-) –  Eric J. Jul 10 '12 at 17:56
    
indeed it did :) –  James Jul 10 '12 at 17:57
if (myclass == null)
    myclass = new MyClass();
share|improve this answer

If you are looking to restrict a class to a single instance, have a look at the Singleton design pattern: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff650316.aspx

share|improve this answer

you can use this constructions for avoid checking

    public class SomeClass
    {
        private MyClass _myClass;
        public MyClass MyClass
        {
            get { return _myClass ?? (_myClass = new MyClass()); }
            set { _myClass = value; }
        }
    }

    public class SomeClass
    {
        private readonly MyClass _myClass = new MyClass();
        public MyClass MyClass
        {
            get { return _myClass; }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.