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I have a table emp having foll data:

EmpID    EmpName   MgrID 

100     King        NULL
101     Smith       100
102     Shine       100
103     Racy        102

Now i want to Display the Employee Name (Boss) and number of Employee (Subordinates) something like this

BOSS       SUBORDINATES

BLAKE                 5

CLARK                 1

FORD                  1

JONES                 2

KING                  3

SCOTT                 1

Please guide how to go about querying this table in SQL Server 2008.

Attempted query:

select e.first_name as ename,m.first_name as mname from employees e,employees m where e.manager_id=m.employee_id
share|improve this question
3  
Is this a homework? – dasblinkenlight Jul 10 '12 at 18:18
6  
what do you have tried?? – LolCoder 아카 쉬 Jul 10 '12 at 18:20
    
select e.first_name as ename,m.first_name as mname from employees e,employees m where e.manager_id=m.employee_id – techie Jul 10 '12 at 18:22
    
While I normally agree with discouraging questions that show a lack of effort, this SQL threw me the first time I had to do it. It looks like a newbie question, and perhaps he isn't even sure where to begin to try. – David Jul 10 '12 at 18:24
1  
Do not ever use implicit joins, they are a SQl antipattern. You should not learn to use poor techniques. – HLGEM Jul 10 '12 at 20:12
up vote 5 down vote accepted
  • Start by self-joining on EmpID=MgrID
  • Group by MgrID and EmpName
  • Select EmpName and count(*)

Translating this to SQL is mechanical:

SELECT b.EmpName, COUNT(*)
FROM Employee e
JOIN Employee b ON b.EmpID=e.MgrID
GROUP BY b.EmpID, b.EmpName
share|improve this answer
    
Though i am not able to execute the query presently,ur logic of approach seems to be right.Appreciate d help. – techie Jul 10 '12 at 18:30
    
Can u please guide when do we actually use group by? – techie Jul 10 '12 at 18:34
1  
@techie You use group by when you need to "collapse" groups of multiple rows into one row per group (the technical term is "to aggregate"). A good (but not a 100% certain) indication of having to use group by is the presence of aggregate functions, such as count, min, max, and so on, in your selection list. – dasblinkenlight Jul 10 '12 at 18:37
1  
@techie If you group by e.EmpName, every employee would become his/her own group (assuming the names are unique, as in your example). All groups will have only one member, so all counts will become 1. You could group by e.MgrID instead of b.EmpID (a bug I just fixed in my last edit) since these two are equal because of the join criteria. – dasblinkenlight Jul 10 '12 at 18:49
2  
@techie Follow this link to sqlfiddle to see how the output of this query is going to look. The query is going to exclude non-managers. If you would like to include them back, see this modified query here. – dasblinkenlight Jul 10 '12 at 19:09
CREATE TABLE test (
   EmpID INT,
   EmpName VARCHAR(100),
   MgrID INT)

INSERT INTO test VALUES (100, 'King', NULL),
                        (101, 'Smith', 100),
                        (102, 'Shine', 100),
                        (103, 'Racy', 102)

SELECT t1.EmpName AS Boss, 
       COUNT(*) AS Subordinates
FROM test AS t1 INNER JOIN test AS t2 ON t1.EmpID = t2.MgrID
GROUP BY t1.EmpName
share|improve this answer
    
use self join to show the unary relationship. – Infravision Jul 10 '12 at 18:31

i was looking for this type of sql and it works...quite good.

   SELECT b.EmpName, COUNT(*)
   FROM Employee e
   JOIN Employee b ON b.EmpID=e.MgrID
   GROUP BY b.EmpID, b.EmpName
share|improve this answer
    
this is also good but bit different. stackoverflow.com/questions/6919880/… – Thomas Sep 14 '12 at 17:41

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