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We are using jQuery in our application for making AJAX calls. How do I inovke a method in a particular context using jQuery? In dojo we used to do it using dojo.hitch(). Is there something similar in jQuery? Below is the sample code that we are using. I need to execute the success handler in the context of SampleMethod. The below code should give me exception since resultSetHandler is not available in the window context. Could you please let me know.

We are using jQuery version 1.3.2

function SampleMethod(){
    this.invokeProcedure=function(procedurePath){
        $.ajax({
                type: "GET",
                url: procedurePath,
                dataType: "json",
                success: resultSetHandler,
                error: errorHandler
            });
    }

    this.resultSetHandler=function(args){
        //Handle the result
    }

    this.errorHandler=function(args){
        //Handle the result
    }

}

var sampleObj=new SampleMethod();
sampleObj.invokeProcedure('url');
share|improve this question
1  
jQuery 1.3.2 was released on 2009-02-19 -- That makes it 3.5 years old, which is an eternity in the jQuery release cycle. I definitely suggest updating to at LEAST 1.5 to get the new ajax rewrite code, but you might as well jump up to the latest (1.7) or even try out 1.8 beta, as it is soon to be released. –  gnarf Jul 10 '12 at 18:31
1  
In particular note that 1.3.2 predates the release of IE9. –  Pointy Jul 10 '12 at 18:38
    
Also the 1059 fixed bugs since 1.3.2: bit.ly/MfB9hv –  gnarf Jul 10 '12 at 18:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just preserve this and wrap them in functions:

this.invokeProcedure=function(procedurePath){
        var savedThis = this;
        $.ajax({
                type: "GET",
                url: procedurePath,
                dataType: "json",
                success: function() { savedThis.resultSetHandler(); },
                error: function() { savedThis.errorHandler(); }
            });
    }

(Probably should pass the "success" function argument forward to "resultSetHandler" too.)


edit — the above will handle this sort of issue in the general case, but @Blaster correctly points out in a comment that the jQuery $.ajax mechanism provides a simpler solution. A context property can be set in the parameter object you pass in, and the value will be used as the context for the callbacks. That is, adding:

context: this,

to the $.ajax parameter object would make things work as you originally wrote it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like calling it var that|self = this; though :) –  Blaster Jul 10 '12 at 18:24
    
@Blaster well it's a matter of taste :-) Sometimes a name that evokes the nature of the object is good, but in this case I couldn't think of anything clever. –  Pointy Jul 10 '12 at 18:25
    
@Pointry: I suspect context: this should also do the trick there instead of that. –  Blaster Jul 10 '12 at 18:26
1  
context: this ajax option also is not available until jQuery 1.4+ jsfiddle.net/FAVar <-- 1.3 here –  gnarf Jul 10 '12 at 18:29
1  
@gnarf ah thanks that makes me feel better for forgetting about it :-) –  Pointy Jul 10 '12 at 18:31

That version of jQuery is hopelessly old at this point, you should upgrade. The function you are looking for is jQuery.proxy and is only available in 1.4+

If you are upgrading though you should consider upgrading to latest, you're only 4 major versions behind right now.

If you are working in an environment which won't allow you to upgrade 3.5 year old libraries, consider copying the source of jQuery.proxy for yourself and making it work.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes very good point. –  Pointy Jul 10 '12 at 18:31
    
I had seen this. But unfortunately we can't use it since our version is 1.3.2. –  Apps Jul 10 '12 at 18:54
    
@Apps - There is no good excuse in 2012 to not upgrade beyond 1.3.2. –  gnarf Jul 10 '12 at 18:57

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