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I have a txt file like this
$CHUNK_QTY = "50000";
$CLIENT = "hi all";
$CLIENT_CODE = "NMB";
$COMPOSER = "DIALOGUE";
$CONTROL_FILE_NAME = "NMBM725.XML";
$COPY_BASE = "01";
$CSITE = "NSH";
$DATA_TYPE = "MET";
$DIALOGUE_VERSION = "V7R0M624";
$DISABLE = "N";
$DPI = "300";
$DP_BAR_START = "A";
$DP_BAR_STOP = "Z";
$DUPLEX = "N";
$Dialogue_Version = "V7R0M624";
$EMAIL_ERROR = "Y";
$EMAIL_ON = "N";

I have many variables up to 500. I would like to access value for corresponding variable. For example if I want to access $DPI it should print 300 . How do I do that in perl. Any help will be appreciated. I would like something different than regex.

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's a quick example showing how to take lines in the format that you gave above and put them into a hash:

#!/usr/bin/env perl    

use strict;
use warnings;

my %vars;
while (my $line = <DATA>) {
  chomp $line;          # remove linebreak
  $line =~ s/^\$//;     # Optional: remove $ from start of variable name

  my ($key, $value) = $line =~ /^(\w+)\s*=\s*(.*)$/;
  $value =~ s/;$//;     # Remove trailing semicolon
  $value =~ s/^"//;     # Remove leading double-quotes
  $value =~ s/"$//;     # Remove trailing double-quotes
  $vars{$key} = $value;
} 

for my $key (sort keys %vars) {
  print "$key has value $vars{$key}\n";
}

print "CLIENT says $vars{CLIENT}\n";

__DATA__
$CHUNK_QTY = "50000";
$CLIENT = "hi all";
$CLIENT_CODE = "NMB";
$COMPOSER = "DIALOGUE";
$CONTROL_FILE_NAME = "NMBM725.XML";
$COPY_BASE = "01";
$CSITE = "NSH";
$DATA_TYPE = "MET";
$DIALOGUE_VERSION = "V7R0M624";
$DISABLE = "N";
$DPI = "300";
$DP_BAR_START = "A";
$DP_BAR_STOP = "Z";
$DUPLEX = "N";
$Dialogue_Version = "V7R0M624";
$EMAIL_ERROR = "Y";
$EMAIL_ON = "N";

There should be enough here to get you started, but you'll need to read up on how to open an actual file (instead of using the __DATA__ section as I did here) for yourself. I recommend checking perldoc open for examples and full details.

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Thank you very much Dave, I think it should be great help. Wow, stackoverflow rocks and you too Dave. –  mysteriousboy Jul 10 '12 at 22:31

Incorrect, wrong, bad, and dangerous way:

eval qx{cat filename.txt};
print "$DPI\n";

or

do "filename.txt";
print "$DPI\n";

so don't do it.

It is much better parse and untaint the file for example with regex...

If not want regex based solution, you at least can use the Safe.pm module:

use Safe;
my $sandbox = new Safe;
$sandbox->rdo( "filename.txt"  ) or die "safe problem $@";

#more safe now
do "filename.txt";
print "$DPI\n";

the rdo is like do but in safe environment, especially it can catch the $X = qx {rm -rf /}; constructions. If the file passed the rdo it probably can be do-ed.

Of course, the above is wrong too, because you cannot use use strict; as TLP already told. The best way is parsing the file.

And for regex based solution you can use:

use strict;
use warnings;
my $re = qr /^\s*\$(\w+)\s*=\s*"(.*)"\s*;\s*$/o;
my %conf = map { m/$re/;($1,$2) } grep {$re} <DATA>;
__END__
$CHUNK_QTY = "50000";
$CLIENT = "hi all";
$CLIENT_CODE = "NMB";
$COMPOSER = "DIALOGUE";
$CONTROL_FILE_NAME = "NMBM725.XML";
$COPY_BASE = "01";
$CSITE = "NSH";
$DATA_TYPE = "MET";
$DIALOGUE_VERSION = "V7R0M624";
$DISABLE = "N";
$DPI = "300";
$DP_BAR_START = "A";
$DP_BAR_STOP = "Z";
$DUPLEX = "N";
$Dialogue_Version = "V7R0M624";
$EMAIL_ERROR = "Y";
$EMAIL_ON = "N";
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1  
Maybe you could give a brief example of the preferred way to do it; you've written four lines of code showing how not to do it, and zero showing an alternative. –  Rob Kennedy Jul 10 '12 at 19:04
1  
See, he explicitly exclude regex based solution. Using do is extremely dangerous, for example when the file contains $C = qx { rm -rf /}; Parsing the file could be easy or hard... depends. But feel free and write the correct way. Im novice here, so thanks for your comment. –  novacik Jul 10 '12 at 19:09
    
Thanks novacik. I thould like there could be some library or something so that I can access variables. –  mysteriousboy Jul 10 '12 at 21:00
    
If absolutely can trust to input, you can use the "do filename" method. For some added safety - see the edited answer. –  novacik Jul 10 '12 at 21:37

You can use do for a file to run it:

do "yourfile";
print $DPI;

However, if you are running under use strict, as you should, you'd need to first declare the variables with our:

use strict;
use warnings;

our $DPI; # plus any other variables you want to use
do "yourfile";
print $DPI;
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Thanks you. Hope its a good way :) –  mysteriousboy Jul 10 '12 at 21:01
1  
@user1515661 You should be aware that do actually executes the file, so if you have reason not to trust the file's content, you should not execute it. There are better ways to store and retrieve data. –  TLP Jul 10 '12 at 22:27

You could use hashes, that way you could write the names and values into the hash list and retrieve them based on their names.

Here is a method to read the contents of a file and put the contents into the hash structure:

my $hash = ();
open FILE, "<", "stuff.txt" or die $!;

while(<FILE>)
{
    my @attr  = split(/=/);
    #this is actually a regexp, but you can read the data in any way you want

    my $key   = $attr[0];
    my $value = $attr[1];
    #only splitting up so that it becomes easier to read

    $hash{$key} = $value;#insert key and value  
}
close (FILE);
print 'Content of $CLIENT:'.$hash{'$CLIENT'};
print 'Content of $CHUNK_QTY:'.$hash{'$CHUNK_QTY'};

Contents of the file "stuff.txt"

$CLIENT="hi all"
$CHUNK_QTY="50000"
share|improve this answer
    
But I already have the file described above. So I want to access variable how can I do that using hash. –  mysteriousboy Jul 10 '12 at 21:02
    
You have to fill in the variables into the hash, I have edited my post. –  Brainbot Jul 10 '12 at 22:39

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