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I'm basically looking for the opposite of this

An example of the XML I'm dealing with:

<profiledesc>
   <creation>
       Finding Aid encoded by Some Guy, <date normal="2011-09-21">21 September 2011</date>
   </creation>
   <langusage encodinganalog="546">
      Finding aid written in
      <language langcode="eng" scriptcode="latn" encodinganalog="041">
         English   
      </language>
   </langusage>
</profiledesc>

An example of the XSLT I'm writting (only the relevant parts):

<xsl:template priority="3" match="descgrp|eadheader|filedesc|titlestmt|profiledesc|archdesc|langusage|did">
   <xsl:apply-templates select="./child::node()"/>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template priority="2" match="language">
   <atom name="EADLanguageOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">
      <xsl:value-of select="."/>
   </atom>
   <atom name="EADLanguageCodeOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">
       <xsl:value-of select="normalize-space(@langcode)"/>
   </atom>
</xsl:template>

... Other templates, for nodes like 'creation' ....

An example of the (bad) output I'm getting:

... Some other tags ...
<atom name="EADCreation" type="text" size="short">Finding Aid encoded by Some Guy, 21 September 2011</atom>
Finding aid written in
<atom name="EADLanguageOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short"> English </atom>
<atom name="EADLanguageCodeOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">eng</atom>
... Some other tags ...

An example of the (good) output I want:

... Some other tags ...
<atom name="EADCreation" type="text" size="short">Finding Aid encoded by Some Guy, 21 September 2011</atom>
<atom name="EADLanguageOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short"> English </atom>
<atom name="EADLanguageCodeOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">eng</atom>
... Some other tags ...

Note that in the second output the "Finding aid written in" line is missing.

So, as you can see, I designed templates to output just the "language" portion of the "langusage" tag, but the whole tag, including the "Finding aid written in" text node, is being output instead. I can't be sure that the text node will exist or that it will be first (or last, or in any particular position). I also can't be sure that there will only be one text node or one child node. So, I can't make use of any solution that relies on simply choosing the "[xth]" node (child or text).

I'd appreciate any advice at this point, even some keywords that would help me find the solution via Google (I've had no luck there so far).

share|improve this question
1  
You need to show exactly what output you want. It's not clear to me and you don't help your case by asking for output like Finding Aid encoded by ... (with ellipses) that doesn't actually appear in your original document. How should I know what you think should appear where the ... are? I can't read your mind. –  lwburk Jul 10 '12 at 19:14
    
@lwburk - Thanks for letting me know you found the question unclear. I've filled out more of the example output. Even better, I've added a line in bold text just below the examples to make clear what I'm looking for. I hope that helps. –  aarondev Jul 10 '12 at 19:57
    
I'm still not completely sure I understand, but I think what you want is to select only the element children. I'll add an answer to that effect in the hope that it helps some. –  lwburk Jul 11 '12 at 5:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sounds like you want to select only the child elements of langusage instead of all child nodes (of any type, which is what node() selects (excluding attribute nodes and the root node)).

For example, this stylesheet:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:template match="langusage">
        <xsl:apply-templates select="*"/>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="language">
        <atom name="EADLanguageOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">
            <xsl:value-of select="normalize-space()"/>
        </atom>
        <atom name="EADLanguageCodeOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">
            <xsl:value-of select="normalize-space(@langcode)"/>
        </atom>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Applied to this simplified input:

<profiledesc>
   <langusage encodinganalog="546">
      Finding aid written in
      <language langcode="eng" scriptcode="latn" encodinganalog="041">
         English   
      </language>
      <language langcode="esp" scriptcode="latn" encodinganalog="042">
         Spanish   
      </language>
   </langusage>
</profiledesc>

Produces the following output:

<atom name="EADLanguageOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">English</atom>
<atom name="EADLanguageCodeOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">eng</atom>
<atom name="EADLanguageOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">Spanish</atom>
<atom name="EADLanguageCodeOfFindingAid" type="text" size="short">esp</atom>

The unwanted text -- Finding aid written in -- does not appear in the output.

Note that the * in:

<xsl:apply-templates select="*"/>

...is just a shorter way to say child::*. Both select all element children of the current node.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I was just about to revise the question because I had discovered that changing child::node() to ./* fixed the problem. Now I'm curious as to why. It seems that node() selects all nodes, even text nodes, while * selects just element children. Correct? –  aarondev Jul 11 '12 at 13:40
    
@aarondev - That's right. node() selects any node type except attributes and the root node, whereas * selects only elements. –  lwburk Jul 11 '12 at 14:23
    
More generally: A node test * is true for any node of the principal node type. For example, child:: will select all element children of the context node, and attribute::* will select all attributes of the context node.* w3.org/TR/xpath/#node-tests –  lwburk Jul 11 '12 at 14:29

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