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I wrote small cuda code to understand global memory to shared memory transfer transactions. The code is as follows:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

__global__ void readUChar4(uchar4* c, uchar4* o){
  extern __shared__ uchar4 gc[];
  int tid = threadIdx.x;
  gc[tid] = c[tid];
  o[tid] = gc[tid];
}

int main(){
  string a = "aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa\
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa\
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa";
  uchar4* c;
  cudaError_t e1 = cudaMalloc((void**)&c, 128*sizeof(uchar4));
  if(e1==cudaSuccess){
    uchar4* o;
    cudaError_t e11 = cudaMalloc((void**)&o, 128*sizeof(uchar4));

    if(e11 == cudaSuccess){
      cudaError_t e2 = cudaMemcpy(c, a.c_str(), 128*sizeof(uchar4), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
      if(e2 == cudaSuccess){
        readUChar4<<<1,128, 128*sizeof(uchar4)>>>(c, o);
        uchar4* oFromGPU = (uchar4*)malloc(128*sizeof(uchar4));
        cudaError_t e22 = cudaMemcpy(oFromGPU, o, 128*sizeof(uchar4), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
        if(e22 == cudaSuccess){
          for(int i =0; i < 128; i++){
            cout << oFromGPU[i].x << " ";
            cout << oFromGPU[i].y << " ";
            cout << oFromGPU[i].z << " ";
            cout << oFromGPU[i].w << " " << endl;

          }
        }
        else{
          cout << "Failed to copy from GPU" << endl;
        }
      }
      else{
        cout << "Failed to copy" << endl;
      }
    }
    else{
      cout << "Failed to allocate output memory" << endl;
    }
  }
  else{
    cout << "Failed to allocate memory" << endl;
  }
  return 0;
}

This code simply copies data from device memory to shared memory and back to device memory. I have the following three questions:

  1. Is the transfer from device memory to shared memory in this case guaranteed to take 4 memory transactions? I believe it depends on how cudaMalloc allocates memory; if the memory is allocated in a haphazard manner such that the data is scattered over memory, then it will take more than 4 memory transactions. However, if cudaMalloc allocates memory in 128 byte chunks or it allocates memory contiguously, then it should not take more than 4 memory transactions.
  2. Does the above logic also hold for writing data from shared memory to device memory i.e., the transfer will complete in 4 memory transactions.
  3. Can this code cause bank conflicts. I believe that this code will not cause bank conflicts, if threads are assigned ids sequentially. However, if thread 32 and 64 are scheduled to run in the same warp, then this code can cause bank conflicts.
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1  
Be careful when writing microbenchmarks like this; the compiler may do things like optimize out the write to shared memory. –  ArchaeaSoftware Jul 11 '12 at 16:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the code you provided (repeated here) the compiler will completely remove the shared memory store and load since they don't do anything necessary or beneficial for the code.

 __global__ void readUChar4(uchar4* c, uchar4* o){
  extern __shared__ uchar4 gc[];
  int tid = threadIdx.x;
  gc[tid] = c[tid];
  o[tid] = gc[tid];
}

Assuming you did something with the shared memory so it was not eliminated, then:

  1. The loads and stores from and to global memory in this code would take ONE transaction per warp (assuming Fermi or later GPU), since they are only 32-bits (uchar4 = 4*8 bits) per thread (total 128 bytes per warp). cudaMalloc allocates memory contiguously.
  2. The answer from 1. applies to stores also, yes.
  3. There are no bank conflicts in this code. Threads in a warp are always contiguous, with the first thread a multiple of the warp size. So threads 32 and 64 will never be in the same warp. And since you are loading and storing a 32-bit data type, and the banks are 32 bits wide, there are no conflicts.
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your response. For question number 1, will it be one transaction per thread, or one transaction per warp? Since each thread is accessing 4 bytes, one warp will access 128 bytes. As I understand the Cuda C programming guide, each warp transaction can be of 128 bytes. Since cudaMalloc allocates memory contiguously, in 1 128 byte transaction the entire warp should be able to read the device memory. Please suggest if I am thinking along the right line. –  gmemon Jul 12 '12 at 14:52
    
Yes, that was my mistake. I edited the answer. Thanks! –  harrism Jul 12 '12 at 23:11
    
Thanks for the correction. If cudaMalloc allocates memory contiguously, then what happens in the case of fragmented memory (i.e., what if a contiguous block of physical memory does not exist)? –  gmemon Jul 13 '12 at 13:05
    
I believe cudaMalloc will return an error. –  harrism Jul 16 '12 at 0:43

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