Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a project which allows the user to edit a list of entities. I map these entities to view models and display them with editor fields. When the user presses the submit button I go through each model and update it like so.

foreach (var viewModel in viewModels)
{
    //Find the database model and set the value and update
    var entity = unit.EntityRepository.GetByID(fieldModel.ID);
    entity.Value = viewModel.Value;
    unit.EntityRepository.Update(entity);
}

The above code works however as you can see if we need to hit the database twice for every entity (one to retrieve and one to update). Is there a more efficient way of doing this using the Entity Framework. I noticed that each update generates a seperated SQL statement. Is there a way of committing all the updates after the loop has finished?

share|improve this question
    
Look @ following link. stackoverflow.com/questions/6199211/… –  Java SE Jul 10 '12 at 20:49
    
@Saqib I am trying to avoid using SQL statements –  Stefan Bossbaly Jul 11 '12 at 13:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here are two ways I know of to update an entity in the database without doing a retrieval of the entity first:

//Assuming person is detached from the context
//for both examples
public void UpdatePerson(Person person)
{
  this.Context.Persons.Attach(person)
  DbEntityEntry<Person> entry = Context.Entry(person);
  entry.State = System.Data.EntityState.Modified;
  Context.SaveChanges();
}

public void UpdatePersonNameOnly(Person person)
{
  this.Context.Persons.Attach(person)
  DbEntityEntry<Person> entry = Context.Entry(person);
  entry.Property(e => e.Name).IsModified = true;
  Context.SaveChanges();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't seem to find the Entry() method, it is not a part of the DbSet class. Is it in an extension class? –  Stefan Bossbaly Jul 11 '12 at 13:16
    
Opps nevermind its in the Context not the DbSet. My bad. –  Stefan Bossbaly Jul 11 '12 at 13:20
    
I'd like to highlight the fact that this is the most elegant solution for changing on mass, I moved the save changes call out of the method, put this in a loop to loop through the objects. Then once looped and the entities are changed, save changes is called. –  Jay Mar 24 at 11:14

You can try the follwoing to minimize queries:

using (var ctx = new MyContext())
{
    var entityDict = ctx.Entities
        .Where(e => viewModels.Select(v => v.ID).Contains(e.ID))
        .ToDictionary(e => e.ID); // one DB query

    foreach (var viewModel in viewModels)
    {
        Entity entity;
        if (entityDict.TryGetValue(viewModel.ID, out entity))
            entity.Value = viewModel.Value;
    }

    ctx.SaveChanges(); //single transaction with multiple UPDATE statements
}

Be aware that Contains can be potentially slow if the list of viewModels is very long. But it will only run a single query.

share|improve this answer

I am not sure whether the current version in beta or RC of Entity Framework supports something like batch update. But their is an extension for EF 4.3.1 on Nuget

http://nuget.org/packages/EntityFramework.Extended

Hope this might help you to achieve your requirement

share|improve this answer
1  
The problem is not get multiple rows back in one post that the user edited. The problem is how to query the database efficiently to store the rows the user edited. –  Stefan Bossbaly Jul 10 '12 at 20:35

HatSoft already mentioned EntityFramework.Extended. Just look at following example based on extended framework.

http://weblogs.asp.net/pwelter34/archive/2011/11/29/entity-framework-batch-update-and-future-queries.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome I will take a look at it –  Stefan Bossbaly Jul 11 '12 at 13:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.