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What is the difference between the following class methods?

Is it that one is static and the other is not?

class Test(object):
  def method_one(self):
    print "Called method_one"

  def method_two():
    print "Called method_two"

a_test = Test()
a_test.method_one()
a_test.method_two()
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9  
No difference other than method_two() definition is invalid and its call fails. –  techtonik Jul 22 '12 at 13:00
3  
@techtonik: Nothing is wrong with the definition of the method_two! It's being called in an incorrect/invalid spec, i.e. with an extra argument. –  0xc0de Sep 10 '13 at 8:36

9 Answers 9

up vote 226 down vote accepted

In Python, there is a distinction between bound and unbound methods.

Basically, a call to a member function (like method_one), a bound function

a_test.method_one()

is translated to

Test.method_one(a_test)

i.e. a call to an unbound method. Because of that, a call to your version of method_two will fail with a TypeError

>>> a_test = Test() 
>>> a_test.method_two()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: method_two() takes no arguments (1 given)

You can change the behavior of a method using a decorator

class Test(object):
    def method_one(self):
        print "Called method_one"

    @staticmethod
    def method_two():
        print "Called method two"

The decorator tells the built-in default metaclass type (the class of a class, cf. this question) to not create bound methods for method_two.

Now, you can invoke static method both on an instance or on the class directly:

>>> a_test = Test()
>>> a_test.method_one()
Called method_one
>>> a_test.method_two()
Called method_two
>>> Test.method_two()
Called method_two
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4  
I support this answer, it is superior to mine. Well done Torsten :) –  freespace Sep 22 '08 at 11:09
    
More Reading on Decorators: python.org/dev/peps/pep-0318 –  Kieveli Aug 18 '09 at 12:04
2  
in python 3 unbound methods are deprecated. instead there is just a function. –  boldnik May 30 '13 at 20:39

Methods in Python are a very, very simple thing once you understood the basics of the descriptor system. Imagine the following class:

class C(object):
    def foo(self):
        pass

Now let's have a look at that class in the shell:

>>> C.foo
<unbound method C.foo>
>>> C.__dict__['foo']
<function foo at 0x17d05b0>

As you can see if you access the foo attribute on the class you get back an unbound method, however inside the class storage (the dict) there is a function. Why's that? The reason for this is that the class of your class implements a __getattribute__ that resolves descriptors. Sounds complex, but is not. C.foo is roughly equivalent to this code in that special case:

>>> C.__dict__['foo'].__get__(None, C)
<unbound method C.foo>

That's because functions have a __get__ method which makes them descriptors. If you have an instance of a class it's nearly the same, just that None is the class instance:

>>> c = C()
>>> C.__dict__['foo'].__get__(c, C)
<bound method C.foo of <__main__.C object at 0x17bd4d0>>

Now why does Python do that? Because the method object binds the first parameter of a function to the instance of the class. That's where self comes from. Now sometimes you don't want your class to make a function a method, that's where staticmethod comes into play:

 class C(object):
  @staticmethod
  def foo():
   pass

The staticmethod decorator wraps your class and implements a dummy __get__ that returns the wrapped function as function and not as a method:

>>> C.__dict__['foo'].__get__(None, C)
<function foo at 0x17d0c30>

Hope that explains it.

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1  
The staticmethod decorator wraps your class (...) This phrase is a bit misleading as the class which is being wrapped is the class of the method foo and not the class in which foo is defined. –  Piotr Dobrogost Jun 25 '13 at 9:42
>>> class Class(object):
...     def __init__(self):
...         self.i = 0
...     def instance_method(self):
...         self.i += 1
...         print self.i
...     c = 0
...     @classmethod
...     def class_method(cls):
...         cls.c += 1
...         print cls.c
...     @staticmethod
...     def static_method(s):
...         s += 1
...         print s
... 
>>> a = Class()
>>> a.class_method()
1
>>> Class.class_method()    # The class shares this value across instances
2
>>> a.instance_method()
1
>>> Class.instance_method() # The class cannot use an instance method
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unbound method instance_method() must be called with Class instance as first argument (got nothing instead)
>>> Class.instance_method(a)
2
>>> b = 0
>>> a.static_method(b)
1
>>> a.static_method(a.c) # Static method does not have direct access to 
>>>                      # class or instance properties.
3
>>> Class.c        # a.c above was passed by value and not by reference.
2
>>> a.c
2
>>> a.c = 5        # The connection between the instance
>>> Class.c        # and its class is weak as seen here.
2
>>> Class.class_method()
3
>>> a.c
5
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2  
Class.instance_method() # The class cannot use an instance method it can use. Just pass the instance manually: Class.instance_method(a) –  warvariuc Jan 19 '12 at 11:35
    
@warwaruk It's there, look at the line below the TyeError line. –  kzh Jan 20 '12 at 14:06
    
yes i saw it later. still, imo, it's not correct to say 'The class cannot use an instance method', because you just did it one line below. –  warvariuc Jan 20 '12 at 16:55

When you call a class member, Python automatically uses a reference to the object as the first parameter. The variable self actually means nothing, it's just a coding convention. You could call it gargaloo if you wanted. That said, the call to method_two would raise a TypeError, because Python is automatically trying to pass a parameter (the reference to its parent object) to a method that was defined as having no parameters.

To actually make it work, you could append this to your class definition:

method_two = staticmethod(method_two)

or you could use the @staticmethod function decorator.

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2  
You mean "the @staticmethod function decorator syntax". –  tzot Sep 22 '08 at 11:03

method_two won't work because you're defining a member function but not telling it what the function is a member of. If you execute the last line you'll get:

>>> a_test.method_two()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: method_two() takes no arguments (1 given)

If you're defining member functions for a class the first argument must always be 'self'.

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that is an error.

first of all, first line should be like this (be careful of capitals)

class Test(object):

Whenever you call a method of a class, it gets itself as the first argument (hence the name self) and method_two gives this error

>>> a.method_two()
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: method_two() takes no arguments (1 given)
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The second one won't work because when you call it like that python internally tries to call it with the a_test instance as the first argument, but your method_two doesn't accept any arguments, so it wont work, you'll get a runtime error. If you want the equivalent of a static method you can use a class method. There's much less need for class methods in Python than static methods in languages like Java or C#. Most often the best solution is to use a method in the module, outside a class definition, those work more efficiently than class methods.

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The call to method_two will throw an exception for not accepting the self parameter the Python runtime will automatically pass it.

If you want to create a static method in a Python class, decorate it with the staticmethod decorator.

Class Test(Object):
  @staticmethod
  def method_two():
    print "Called method_two"

Test.method_two()
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work either, you have to omit self then. –  Armin Ronacher Sep 22 '08 at 11:13
    
You're correct. Was too quick with copy-paste. Fixed it. –  user18044 Sep 22 '08 at 12:47

Please read this docs from the Guido First Class everything Clearly explained how Unbound, Bound methods are born.

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