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How can I output the value of an enum class in C++11? In C++03 it's like this:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

enum A {
  a = 1,
  b = 69,
  c= 666
};

int main () {
  A a = A::c;
  cout << a << endl;
}

in c++0x this code doesn't compile

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

enum class A {
  a = 1,
  b = 69,
  c= 666
};

int main () {
  A a = A::c;
  cout << a << endl;
}


prog.cpp:13:11: error: cannot bind 'std::ostream' lvalue to 'std::basic_ostream<char>&&'
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-pc-linux-gnu/4.5.1/../../../../include/c++/4.5.1/ostream:579:5: error:   initializing argument 1 of 'std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&&, const _Tp&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Tp = A]'

compiled at Ideone.com

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1  
Why you're trying to output enum? enum class is used to don't mix up enum values with int representation –  RiaD Jul 10 '12 at 20:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 34 down vote accepted

Unlike an unscoped enumeration, a scoped enumeration is not implicitly convertible to its integer value. You need to explicitly convert it to an integer using a cast:

std::cout << static_cast<std::underlying_type<A>::type>(a) << std::endl;

You may want to encapsulate the logic into a function template:

template <typename Enumeration>
auto as_integer(Enumeration const value)
    -> typename std::underlying_type<Enumeration>::type
{
    return static_cast<typename std::underlying_type<Enumeration>::type>(value);
}

used as:

std::cout << as_integer(a) << std::endl;
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1  
Is there a reason this uses trailing return type syntax? –  Nicol Bolas Jul 10 '12 at 20:41
    
@NicolBolas: I copied as_integer from one of my open-source libraries, CxxReflect (see enumeration.hpp). The library uses trailing return types consistently, everywhere. For consistency. –  James McNellis Jul 10 '12 at 20:42
2  
Although this is 2 years late, in case someone else sees this question you can just use the cast technique method above and simply call "static_cast<int>(value)" to get the integer or "static_cast<A>(intValue)" to get an enum value. Just bear in mind that going from int to enum or enum to enum can cause issues and generally is generally a sign of a design bug. –  Benjamin Danger Johnson Apr 16 '14 at 21:23
1  
int(value) and A(intValue) also work, without the ugly angle brackets. –  Grault Dec 30 '14 at 6:42
    
There is an alternate answer (using SFINAE) which allows the following syntax to work as well: std::cout << a << std::endl. See my answer –  James Adkison Feb 25 at 21:26
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

using namespace std;

enum class A {
  a = 1,
  b = 69,
  c= 666
};

std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, const A& obj)
{
   os << static_cast<std::underlying_type<A>::type>(obj);
   return os;
}

int main () {
  A a = A::c;
  cout << a << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I copied this example verbatim and compiled it as g++ -std=c++0x enum.cpp but I'm getting a bunch of compiler errors -> pastebin.com/JAtLXan9. I also couldn't get the example from @james-mcnellis to compile. –  Dennis May 17 '13 at 23:18
2  
@Dennis underlying_type is only in C++11 –  Deqing Aug 8 '13 at 2:03

(I'm not allowed to comment yet.) I would suggest the following improvements to the already great answer of James McNellis:

template <typename Enumeration>
constexpr auto as_integer(Enumeration const value)
    -> typename std::underlying_type<Enumeration>::type
{
    static_assert(std::is_enum<Enumeration>::value, "parameter is not of type enum or enum class");
    return static_cast<typename std::underlying_type<Enumeration>::type>(value);
}

with

  • constexpr: allowing me to use an enum member value as compile-time array size
  • static_assert+is_enum: to 'ensure' compile-time that the function does sth. with enumerations only, as suggested

By the way I'm asking myself: Why should I ever use enum class when I would like to assign number values to my enum members?! Considering the conversion effort.

Perhaps I would then go back to ordinary enum as I suggested here: How to use enums as flags in C++?

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You should be able to use SFINAE to write a generic operator<< that will work for all scoped enumerations.

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

// Scoped enum
enum class Color
{
    Red,
    Green,
    Blue
};

// Unscoped enum
enum Orientation
{
    Horizontal,
    Vertical
};

// Another scoped enum
enum class ExecStatus
{
    Idle,
    Started,
    Running
};

template<typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(typename std::enable_if<std::is_enum<T>::value, std::ostream>::type& stream, const T& e)
{
    return stream << static_cast<typename std::underlying_type<T>::type>(e);
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << Color::Blue << "\n";
    std::cout << Vertical << "\n";
    std::cout << ExecStatus::Running << "\n";
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You need a typename before std::underlying_type<T>::type. –  uckelman Feb 21 at 14:39
    
@uckelman You're absolutely correct. Thanks for updating my answer. –  James Adkison Feb 21 at 14:44

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