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I have the following question that's been nagging at me for quite some time. I'd like to model the following domain entity "Contact":

public class Contact:IEntity<Contact>
{
    private readonly ContactId _Id;
    public ContactId Id
    {
        get { return this._Id; }
    }


    private CoreAddress _CoreAddress;
    public CoreAddress CoreAddress
    {
        get { return this._CoreAddress; }
        set
        {
            if (value == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("CoreAddress");
            this._CoreAddress = value;
        }
    }


    private ExtendedAddress _ExtendedAddress;
    public ExtendedAddress ExtendedAddress
    {
        get { return this._ExtendedAddress; }
        set
        {
            if (value == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("ExtendedAddress");
            this._ExtendedAddress = value;
        }
    }

    private readonly IList<ContactExchangeSubscription> _Subscriptions
        = new List<ContactExchangeSubscription>();

    public IEnumerable<ContactExchangeSubscription> Subscriptions
    {
        get { return this._Subscriptions; }
    }

    public Contact(ContactId Id, CoreAddress CoreAddress, ExtendedAddress ExtendedAddress)
    {
        Validations.Validate.NotNull(Id);
        this._Id = Id;
        this._CoreAddress = CoreAddress;
        this._ExtendedAddress = ExtendedAddress;
    }
  }

As you can see it has a collection of subscriptions. A subscription is modeled like this:

 public class ContactExchangeSubscription
{
    private ContactId _AssignedContact;
    public ContactId AssignedContact
    {
        get { return this._AssignedContact; }
        set
        {
            if (value == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("AssignedContact");
            this._AssignedContact = value;
        }
    }

    private User _User;
    public User User
    {
        get { return this._User; }
        set
        {
            Validations.Validate.NotNull(value, "User");
            this._User = value;
        }
    }


    private ExchangeEntryId _EntryId;
    public ExchangeEntryId EntryId
    {
        get { return this._EntryId; }
        set
        {
            if (value == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("EntryId");
            this._EntryId = value;
        }
    }


    public ContactExchangeSubscription(ContactId AssignedContact, User User, ExchangeEntryId EntryId)
    {
        this._AssignedContact = AssignedContact;
        this._User = User;
        this._EntryId = EntryId;
    }



}

Now I've been thinking that I shouldnt model a storage technology (Exchange) in my domain, after all, we might want to switch our application to other subscription providers. The property "EntryId" is specific to Exchange. A subscription would always need a User and a ContactId, though. Is there a better way to model the Subscription? Should I use a factory or abstract factory for the Subscription type to cover other types of subscriptions, should the need arise?

EDIT: So let's toss an abstract factory in the ring and introduce some interfaces:

public interface IContactSubscriptionFactory
{
    IContactSubscription Create();
}

public interface IContactSubscription
{
    ContactId AssignedContact { get;}
    User User { get; }
}

How would a concrete factory for a ContactExchangeSubscription be coded? Remember that this type will need the EntryID field, so it has to get an additional ctr parameter. How to handle different constructor paremeters on different sub-types in factories in general?

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2 Answers 2

I think the answer is staring you in the face in that you need to work against an interface making it easier to introduce new subscription providers (if that's the right term) in the future. I think this is more of an OO design question that DDD.

public interface ISubscriptionProvider
{
    ContactId AssignedContact { get; }
    User User { get; }
}

And the code in your contract becomes

private readonly IList<ISubscriptionProvider> _subscriptions
    = new List<ISubscriptionProvider>();

public IEnumerable<ISubscriptionProvider> Subscriptions
{
    get { return _subscriptions; }
}

With regards to using a factory; the purpose of a factory is to construct your domain objects when a creation strategy is required. For example a SubscriptionProviderFactory could be used within your repository when you rehydrate your aggregate and would make the decision to return the ContactExchangeSubscription (as an ISubscriptionProvider) or something else based on the data passed into it.

One final point but perhaps this is just because of the way you have shown your example. But I would say your not really following DDD, the lack of behaviour and with all your propeties having public getters and setters, suggestions your falling into the trap of building an Aemic Domain Model.

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Thank you for your answer, I have left out some behaviour of the classes to simplify my example code, I'm aware of the danger of anemic domain models. –  hoetz Jul 11 '12 at 6:28
    
Following up on your answer: If the repository creates a ContactExchangeSubscription with the factory and returns it as ISubscriptionProvider, I'd have to cast it in the upper layer. At some point in my system I definitely have to use the EntryId. I'm a bit confused about when and how to get the concrete type. –  hoetz Jul 11 '12 at 7:46
    
Honestly this is difficult to answer with out see the full problem - why would you need to cast it in the upper layer of your application - whats the scenario? –  Chris Moutray Jul 11 '12 at 14:32
    
I think you should designing your aggregates for behaviour and not display. –  Chris Moutray Jul 11 '12 at 14:33
    
added an answer, hope to see your comments on it –  hoetz Jul 12 '12 at 18:58

After some research I came up with this. Code first, explanation below:

public interface IContactFactory<TSubscription> where TSubscription : IContactSubscription
{
    Contact Create(ContactId Id, CoreAddress CoreAddress, ExtendedAddress ExtendedAddress, TSubscription Subscription);
}

public class ContactFromExchangeFactory : IContactFactory<ContactExchangeSubscription>
{
    public Contact Create(ContactId Id, CoreAddress CoreAddress, ExtendedAddress ExtendedAddress, ContactExchangeSubscription ExchangeSubscription)
    {
        Contact c = new Contact(Id, CoreAddress, ExtendedAddress);
        c.AddSubscription(ExchangeSubscription);
        return c;
    }
}

I realized that I dont need a factory for the Contactsubscription but rather for the contact itself.

I learned some things about factories along the way:

  • They are only to be used when creating (really) new entities, not when rebuilding them from a SQL DB for example
  • They live in the domain layer (see above!)
  • Factories are more suitable for similar objects that differ in behaviour rather than data

I welcome comments and better answers.

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