Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this base class:

public abstract class Parent {
    public void DoSomething() {
        var c=new GenericClass<**ThisInstanceType**>();
        c.DoYourThing();
    }
}

What should I put instead ThisInstanceType in order to use generics with the type of "this" (the current child instance)?

I cannot change the declaration of Parent.DoSomething(). It cannot be void DoSomething<T>().

share|improve this question
1  
It would be nice if the downvoter will explain what she didn't understand. –  Naor Jul 10 '12 at 20:59
    
You're doing it wrong. If DoSomething depends on the type of the child class, it should be generic or virtual and reimplemented in the subclass. (Or the Parent class itself can be generic, as noted.) –  Dark Falcon Jul 10 '12 at 20:59
    
@Dark Falcon: Usually you are right. I should make DoSomething virtual and implement it in the child. But what if I have many childs and the difference is ONLY and will only be the T in GenericClass<T>? –  Naor Jul 10 '12 at 21:07
    
@Joel, FYI: I was not the downvoter... –  Dark Falcon Jul 11 '12 at 13:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could do:

public abstract class Parent<T> : IParent
{
    public void DoSomething() {
        var c=new GenericClass<T>();
        c.DoYourThing();
    }
}

public sealed class Child : Parent<Child>
{
}

and if necessary you could add:

public interface IParent { void DoSomething(); }

BTW: If you include the full complete real life example, I might be able to give you a better solution

The other solution would be to use reflection to get the proper type and call the method at runtime...

share|improve this answer
    
You right! giving the generic to the class is the solution! –  Naor Jul 10 '12 at 22:52

If you make your abstract class generic, you can implement it like this:

public abstract class Parent<T> where T : Parent<T> {
    public void DoSomething() {
        var c = new GenericClass<T>();
        c.DoYourThing();
    }
 }

public class Child : Parent<Child> {}
share|improve this answer
    
The 'where T : Parent' part is not compiled. –  Naor Jul 10 '12 at 21:58
    
You are right, of course. It should be where T : Parent<T>. My mistake. –  Steve Czetty Jul 11 '12 at 12:18

If you really cannot design it properly, you could do it via reflection. I hesitate to suggest that, as you really should be redesigning your interface, but:

Type t = typeof(GenericClass<>).MakeGenericType(this.GetType());
object c = Activator.CreateInstance(t);
c.InvokeMember("DoYourThing", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, c, new object[] {});
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.