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I have a .NET Service Reference that I'd like to encapsulate into a single, reusable class.

I typical call looks something like this:

// instantiate the api and set credentials
ApiClient api = new ApiClient();
api.Credentials.UserName.UserName = "blah";
api.Credentials.UserName.Password = "blahblah";

// operation-specific search parameter object
SomethingSearch search = new SomethingSearch();
search.Key = "blah";

Result[] result = api.GetSomething(search);

api.Close();

Other calls vary in both the operation called and the search parameter object.

The thing is, I don't know how to pass into the class both the name of the API operation (i.e. GetSomething() and the operation-specific search object (SomethingSearch).

How might I accomplish this? I'm not asking for the work to be done for me, but I'm not sure where to begin. I believe it has something to do with Func<T> and delegates but I'm embarrassingly inexperienced with them.

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1  
There are many patterns available for handling this all over the internet, you just have to make sure that you appropriately close your services and don't make the mistake of utilizing the using statement. –  Jaime Torres Jul 10 '12 at 22:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A colleague of mine developed this solution:

/// <summary>
/// Proxy for executing generic service methods
/// </summary>
public class ServiceProxy
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Execute service method and get return value
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="C">Type of service</typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Type of return value</typeparam>
    /// <param name="action">Delegate for implementing the service method</param>
    /// <returns>Object of type T</returns>
    public static T Execute<C, T>(Func<C, T> action) where C : class, ICommunicationObject, new()
    {
        C svc = null;

        T result = default(T);

        try
        {
            svc = new C();

            result = action.Invoke(svc);

            svc.Close();
        }
        catch (FaultException ex)
        {
            // Logging goes here
            // Service Name: svc.GetType().Name
            // Method Name: action.Method.Name
            // Duration: You could note the time before/after the service call and calculate the difference
            // Exception: ex.Reason.ToString()

            if (svc != null)
            {
                svc.Abort();
            }

            throw;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Logging goes here

            if (svc != null)
            {
                svc.Abort();
            }

            throw;
        }

        return result;
    }
}

And an example of its use:

public class SecurityServiceProxy
{

    public static UserInformation GetUserInformation(Guid userId)
    {
        var result = ServiceProxy.Execute<MySecurityService, UserInformation>
        (
            svc => svc.GetUserInformation(userId)
        );

        return result;
    }

    public static bool IsUserAuthorized(UserCredentials creds, ActionInformation actionInfo)
    {
        var result = ServiceProxy.Execute<MySecurityService, bool>
        (
            svc => svc.IsUserAuthorized(creds, actionInfo)
        );

        return result;
    }
 }

In this fake case, we are using two methods fromMySecurityService, GetUserInformation and IsUserAuthorized. GetUserInformation takes a Guid as an argument and returns a UserInformation object. IsUserAuthorized takes a UserCredentials and ActionInformation object, and returns a bool whether or not the user is authorized.

This proxy is also a perfect place to cache cacheable service call results.

If you need to send parameters to the server, there may be a more generic way of doing so, but I think you'd need to create a specific proxy for it. Example:

public interface ISecuredService
{
   public UserCredentials Credentials { get; set; }
}

/// <summary>
/// Proxy for executing generic UserCredentials  secured service methods
/// </summary>
public class SecuredServiceProxy
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Execute service method and get return value
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="C">Type of service</typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Type of return value</typeparam>
    /// <param name="credentials">Service credentials</param>
    /// <param name="action">Delegate for implementing the service method</param>
    /// <returns>Object of type T</returns>
    public static T Execute<C, T>(UserCredentials credentials, Func<C, T> action) where C : class, ICommunicationObject, ISecuredService, new()
    {
        C svc = null;

        T result = default(T);

        try
        {
            svc = new C();
            svc.Credentials = credentials;

            result = action.Invoke(svc);

            svc.Close();
        }
        catch (FaultException ex)
        {
            // Logging goes here
            // Service Name: svc.GetType().Name
            // Method Name: action.Method.Name
            // Duration: You could note the time before/after the service call and calculate the difference
            // Exception: ex.Reason.ToString()

            if (svc != null)
            {
                svc.Abort();
            }

            throw;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Logging goes here

            if (svc != null)
            {
                svc.Abort();
            }

            throw;
        }

        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I was looking for. Awesome, thanks! –  Chad Levy Jul 11 '12 at 22:19
    
Curiously, how would you pass a parameter into the proxy? In my specific case, svc requires an object that contains Username and Password. –  Chad Levy Sep 14 '12 at 0:00
    
@Paperjam I've updated to include a more concrete example of how to pass various arguments to service method calls. Please let me know if you would like further clarification. –  Jaime Torres Sep 14 '12 at 1:20
    
In your example, the UserCredentials are passed as a parameter for IsUserAuthorized. In my specific case, UserCredentials are a parameter for svc. –  Chad Levy Sep 14 '12 at 1:36
    
@Paperjam In the last update I made, I included a "SecuredServiceProxy". If your service inherits from a base class, you could define C to be that base class and instead of passing in credentials as a property, you could pass it in with the constructor (assuming the base class required that constructor). –  Jaime Torres Sep 14 '12 at 1:38

You can take a simmilar approach to most WCF implementations & create an interface defining the API functionality & hiding the implementation behind that interface. Here's a quick example using your code sample:

    class APIEngine :IApiProvider
    {
        //...Private stuff & other methods
        T[] Search<T>(SearchArgs args)
        {
           //Error handling ommitted
           T[] result;

           switch(args.SearchType)
           {
               case(SearchType.GetSomething)
                    result = GetSomethingSearch(args.Key);
                    break;
               // and so on
           }     


           api.Close();
          return result;
       }
       Result[] GetSomethingSearch(Key searchKey)
       {   
           ApiClient api = new ApiClient(); 
           api.Credentials.UserName.UserName = "blah";
           api.Credentials.UserName.Password = "blahblah";   

           object SomethingSearch search = new SomethingSearch(); 
           search.Key = searchKey;

           result = api.GetSomething(search);  
       }
    }


class SearchArgs
{
    SearchType SearchType {get; set;} //Enum of search types
    SearchKey Key {get; set;} //SearchKey would be parent class for different key types
{

You would call this just like any other interface:

IApiProvider.Search(keyValue);

Everything else can be set during construction or re-set later on via dedicated methods. Let me know if this doesn't actually answer your question.

EDIT:

Using a wrapper class for the arguments allows you to have a single friendly Search method that can take any number of Search types by falling through the case to determine the correct type based on your SearchType.

share|improve this answer
    
The thing is, I need to be able to specify which api operation and search objects to use. SomethingSearch could be SomethingElseSearch, and GetSomething could be GetSomethingElse, for example. The different search objects have different numbers of parameters as well. –  Chad Levy Jul 10 '12 at 21:50
    
Please see my edits & let me know if you have any questions –  Chris Jul 10 '12 at 22:20

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