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Basically, I imagine some psuedocode that looks like this

build_command_list {
   add_command("cmd 1")
   add_command("cmd 2")
   conditional_branch( some_cond ) {
      add_command("cmd3")
      add_command("cmd4")
   }
   conditional_branch( some_other_cond ) {
      add_command("cmd 5")
   }
}

The method build_command_list will take a block of code and then recursively build a tree structure where each node is a command, and some interpreter will take that tree and execute it from the root, which is the first command in that block of code (in this case, "cmd 1")

add_command and conditional_branch are other methods that determine how the node will be created.

There are commands like conditional branch which tell the interpreter to evaluate a condition, and if true, it will process its list of commands.

I am wondering whether ruby has something that will allow me to write a piece of code like the example above as well as take the code and parse it?

And if not, maybe someone can suggest a way for me to write the input in such a way that I can build the correct command tree from a set of commands?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can write a DSL that does exactly this:

Class

class CommandList
  def add_command(str)
    puts "Adding command #{str}"
  end

  def conditional_branch(condition, &block)
    b = ConditionalBranch.new(condition)

    puts "With condition: #{condition} {"
    b.instance_eval(&block)
    puts "}"
  end
end

class ConditionalBranch < CommandList
  def initialize condition
    @condition = condition
  end
end

def build_command_list &block
  c = CommandList.new
  c.instance_eval(&block)
end

DSL Usage

build_command_list {
   add_command("cmd 1")
   add_command("cmd 2")
   conditional_branch( "some_cond" ) {
      add_command("cmd3")
      add_command("cmd4")
   }
   conditional_branch( "some_other_cond" ) {
      add_command("cmd 5")
   }
}

Output

Adding command cmd 1
Adding command cmd 2
With condition: some_cond {
Adding command cmd3
Adding command cmd4
}
With condition: some_other_cond {
Adding command cmd 5
}

Note that this probably doesn't handle conditions the way you want it to, it's just an example of how you can use instance_eval to evaluate blocks in the context of a given object

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Ruby's pretty powerful. Well, I guess DSL's are. Didn't know you could create things like this lol. For the condition it should be fine because I really just needed a way to identify that it is a node that contains a block so that I can perform the appropriate recursive calls to account for that. –  MxyL Jul 10 '12 at 22:14

what you are talking about here is called a DSL (Domain Specific Language).

you can implement internal and external DSLs in ruby.

for an external DSL you will need to create a parser. that's why its often better to create an internal DSL with ruby.

i wrote a blog-post about the basic techniques that can be used to achieve this: http://blog.nofail.de/2010/02/writing-your-own-dsl-with-ruby/

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The bullet points sound like what I want to achieve. I am providing a set of methods that will allow other users to interact with the interpreter, and they will use a set of method calls to indicate which commands will be created, and how the tree should be structured, in plain ruby. My first attempt at trying to work with the blocks of code was to explicitly add commands that tell the interpreter that the following is the start and end of a block, but it is ugly and easy to mess up (I mean, it works, but it's really unfriendly). I will see whether an internal DSL will do the trick. –  MxyL Jul 10 '12 at 22:02

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