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My actual problem is a little more complicated and requires using template classes. This is a simpler version of that.

I have two classes:

class A
{
public:
   float a() { return _value; }
private:
   float _value;
};

class B
{
public:
   float b() { return _value; }
private:
   float _value;
};

class AB : public A, public B
{
public:
   // a() should return A::_value ?
   // b() should return B::_value ?
}

Will there be any conflicts between the members _value from A and B if that member is private? It makes sense that there would not be such a conflict since AB has no knowledge of that member.

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3  
Sidenote: Class templates generate classes. There is no such thing as a template class. –  Marcelo Cantos Jul 10 '12 at 23:40
    
@MarceloCantos Not true. A template class was originally the instantiation of a class template, now template class just means class template. –  curiousguy Jul 26 '12 at 12:51
    
@curiousguy: "Was" is not "is". While I don't have an authoritative source handy, I did come across this comment in the C++ Templates FAQ: Note that the 1998 C++ standard used the terms "template class" and "template function" in some places, but this was corrected in the 2003 version. –  Marcelo Cantos Jul 27 '12 at 0:27
    
@MarceloCantos I recall that the 1997 C++ standard randomly used both terms. Usage of "template class" was discontinued as too confusing. This is even worse in French: class template = template de classe; template class = classe issue de template (or class templatée ?). Many French translation were wrong. –  curiousguy Jul 27 '12 at 0:40
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Even if the members were public, there would be no conflict. There would, however, be an ambiguity if you tried to access _value from AB's scope (assuming AB inherits from A and B) without qualifying it somehow:

class A { public: float _value; };
class B { public: float _value; };
class AB : public A, public B {
public:
  void f() {
    std::cout << _value;    // Error: ambiguous reference
    std::cout << A::_value; // OK
  }
};
class AB2 : public A, public B {
public:
  using B::_value;
  void f() {
    std::cout << _value; // OK; resolves to B's version.
  }
};
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Correct. But _value is private and is anyhow cannot be accessed directly from AB scope. –  Mahesh Jul 10 '12 at 23:48
2  
@Mahesh: but access control is applied long after name lookup, so this is an important point. –  Kerrek SB Jul 10 '12 at 23:50
    
@Mahesh: The OP asked, "Will there be any conflicts … if that member is private?" My opening sentence answers both aspects of the question and makes it abundantly clear that I was well-aware of the point you make. –  Marcelo Cantos Jul 11 '12 at 0:03
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There would not be any conflict and each subobject data member is different from the other. I believe AB is a class that inherits both A, B.

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First of all, don't forget to actually inherit from A and B.

That said, each of the member functions simply refers to the variable in its own class. Neither A::a() nor B::b() are aware of the existence of the other, nor of the fact that they will be derived from, and are entirely distinct.

Therefore, if you change your code a little to be as follows:

class A {
    float value_;
  public:
    float& a() { return value_; } 
};

class B {
    float value_;
  public:
    float& b() { return value_; } 
};

struct AB : A, B {
} ab;

You will now find that after ab.a() = 1; ab.b() = 2;, despite B::value_ being modified, A::value_ is unchanged and std::cout << ab.a(); prints 1.

That also said, you are probably running into issues specific to class templates; for example, you may not be realising that every instantiation of a class template comes with its own static variables. (I'm not saying this is the case, just that it sounds like your problem is unrelated to what you posted.)

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