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I'm thinking of Mask as in a circuit Mask (I think)- let me explain with a handy chart

mask chart

The common source would be physically in c:\source

Instance A would be physically in c:\instanceA but initially have nothing but symlinks to everything in c:\source

Instance B would be physically in c:\instanceB but initially have nothing but symlinks to everything in c:\source

As you made changes to Instance A and Instance B, you would have create a mask that would hide files from CommonSource if they were deleted from the Instance folders and create a new physical file in the instance directory if an existing Common Source file was modified. New files would live in the instance folders but never make it back to the Common Source.

This type of setup would be very useful for a project where I want to do many different types of small tweaks to multiple instances where distinct threads would work on distinct instances.

I know about symbolic links but they fall short in the case of modifying a file.

Is there anything that can accomplish this? If not, should I try to make this and patent it? Seems like a good idea to me.

I would be on Windows Server 2008 or later.

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To answer your last question, on patents: no. –  Andrew Aylett Jul 20 '12 at 16:38
    
The real question is this: Do you have a problem with the data size or do you have a problem with the management of these "instances"? A useful answer should address these aspects. –  A.H. Jul 20 '12 at 16:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
+300

Fearing I'm stating the obvious, but git is one tool that can be used to achieve this behavior.

  1. Make your "Common Source" a git repository
  2. Clone the repository twice to "InstanceA" and "InstanceB"
  3. In each instance, check out a new, unique branch

As changes are made in "Common Source" you can merge those changes into "InstanceA" and "InstanceB" while maintaining the "MASK" (changes to the branch) you've created for each.

This has the added benefit of allowing changes from "Common Source" to be pulled as you wish instead of having changes to "Common Source" pushed out to each instance (something I imagine would be less desirable and more prone to error).

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Good point, but when I clone the repo, am I not making actual physical copies of the files on the file system? –  Matt Jul 11 '12 at 17:56
    
Yes, InstanceA and InstanceB start as identical copies of Common Source - the "link" is the git repository, able to manage diversions from the Common Source in each instance while still allowing changes from Common Source to appear within each instance (when merged in using git). –  Deefour Jul 11 '12 at 18:00
    
You could achieve the same with Subversion too and arguably with a lot less hassle. The only thing I would add is that to achieve the behaviour you want, you would Checkout the repository to two locations InstanceA and InstanceB and then never Update them or Commit them. If you did an Update, then that folder will get all the changes from Common while retaining it's own changes and if you did a Commit, it would push back it's changes and merge those into the files in Common. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Jul 18 '12 at 9:56

You're looking for a union mount. Unfortunately, I'm not aware of any implementations for Windows, but there are several available for Linux, notably UnionFS.

In general they are used for making a read-only filesystem look like it's read-write: typically on live-CDs.

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I was torn to who to award the bounty to -- If I could have divided it, you would have gotten 1/3 of it, I couldn't so I went with where the community voted. Thanks though –  Matt Jul 20 '12 at 17:42

Since Windows 7 you can use libraries, which will allow you to include files from more than one physical location.

Windows 7 also include VirtualStore type of folder (for example, when creating or modifying a file in Program Files folder, it will actually be created in a user specific folder: C:\Users\user\AppData\Local\VirtualStore. However - I don't know how you can create this type of folders yourself, and also, as far as I know, you can add and modify files, but not delete files in that way.

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I was torn to who to award the bounty to -- If I could have divided it, you would have gotten 1/3 of it, I couldn't so I went with where the community voted. Thanks though –  Matt Jul 20 '12 at 17:43
    
Thanks @Matt. The community is right that using source-control has many advantages, though this is not what you've asked for. A real nice solution would be a combination of both ideas - a source-control client that is aware of the fact that the local copies have much in common and would be smart about managing the similarities and differences in the way you describe. –  Yasei No Umi Jul 21 '12 at 10:35

You'll want a versioning control system that supports per file checkout and permissions. Then you just need to set up a simple API converter that takes file-system commands and converts them to versioning control commands.

Delete -> disable permission to access file.

Directory commands should look for local copies and things you have permission to access.

Open -> grab local copy, on fail check-out file from repository.

Save -> disable permission, save local copy. //Avoid duplicates being seen.

Close without saving -> if permission to access from repository, delete local copy.

((By the way, this storage optimization seems somewhat spurious for versioning. Disk space is relatively cheap.

If your interest isn't in versioning, I'd suggest looking into separating out the information you would potentially want as volatile and creating configuration files for each branch. This, of course, requires a predictable pattern to the changes.))

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IBM Rational ClearCase is version control system which does file-mask-like behaviour. It is known as MVFS: MultiVersion File System and can be mount to a workstation like a ordinary network drive.

ClearCase server (aka. VOB) you can store several versions of the same file, each on different code branch. The sets of files visible by user are called views. Each view has a configuration (aka. configuration specification), which defines what files and versions are visible for current user. Typical file looks like this:

# From wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Rational_ClearCase#Configuration_specifications
# Show all elements that are checked out to this view, regardless any other rules.
element * CHECKEDOUT

# For all files named 'somefile', regardless of location, always show the latest version
# on the main branch.
element .../somefile /main/LATEST

# Use a specific version of a specific file. Note: This rule must appear before
# the next rule to have any effect!
element /vobs/project1/module1/a_header.h /main/proj_dev_branch/my_dev_branch1/14

# For other files in the 'project1/module1' directory, show versions
# labeled  'PROJ1_MOD2_LABEL_1'. Furthermore, don't allow any checkouts in this path.
element /vobs/project1/module1/... PROJ1_MOD2_LABEL_1 -nocheckout

# Show the 'ANOTHER_LABEL' version of all elements under the 'project1/module2' path.
# If an element is checked out, then branch that element from the currently
# visible version, and add it to the 'module2_dev_branch' branch.
element /vobs/project1/module2/... ANOTHER_LABEL -mkbranch module2_dev_branch
share|improve this answer
    
I was torn to who to award the bounty to -- If I could have divided it, you would have gotten 1/3 of it, I couldn't so I went with where the community voted. Thanks though –  Matt Jul 20 '12 at 17:43
    
No problem :) Glad to help. –  Secator Jul 20 '12 at 20:03

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