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When converting NSString to constants, I usually use

[@"..." UTF8String];

I was just looking over apple docs on address book programming and i see they use the macro

CFSTR("...");

Out of curiousity, I'm just wondering is there any different between the two?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

CFSTR("...") is essentially the Core Foundation equivalent of @"...". In fact, you can do the following:

const char *utf8dots = [(NSString *)CFSTR("...") UTF8String];

And you'll get the same result as you would with your first line of code.

In theory, CFSTR() creates a constant CFString, while @"" creates a constant NSString. In practice, the two types are interchangeable.

Does that help?

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so basically, there is no practical difference in the value returned by CFSTR("foo") and the value returned by [@"foo" UTFTString] ? –  Jai Jul 11 '12 at 6:50
    
No, re-read. There's no practical difference between CFSTR("foo") and @"foo". -UTF8String can be sent to either and returns a third type of string, a C string encoded as UTF-8. That string isn't an object, it's a bare C pointer. –  Jonathan Grynspan Jul 11 '12 at 12:57

Those create completely different sorts of things. One gets you a CFStringRef, which is an object (well, a CFType, but that's compatible with objects). The other gets you a char*, which is just an array of chars, and not an object at all. You could, for example, do this:

[(NSString *)CFSTR("foo") UTF8String];

and that would be totally valid.

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so basically, there is no practical difference in the value returned by CFSTR("foo") and the value returned by [@"foo" UTFTString] ? –  Jai Jul 11 '12 at 6:50
1  
That's the opposite of what I said. There's no practical difference between CFSTR("foo") and @"foo". There's a HUGE difference between either of those, and the return value of -UTF8String –  Catfish_Man Jul 11 '12 at 18:13
    
ok. i understand now –  Jai Jul 12 '12 at 11:36

The former doesn't actually create anything, it simply returns an internal const char pointer of an NSString (run-time function). The latter will create a compile-time constant CFStringRef value. It cannot be used with variables because those variables will not be available at compile time.

EDIT I realize that last sentence is a bit vague. You can use the result of CFSTR as a variable, but you cannot pass a variable as an argument.

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What do you mean by "it cannot be used with variables" here? –  Rob Napier Jul 11 '12 at 2:49
    
If you try to insert a variable instead of a literal string you will get an error. –  borrrden Jul 11 '12 at 2:50

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