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I'm using Data.Serialize.Get and am trying to define the following combinator:

getConsumed :: Get a -> Get (ByteString, a)

which should act like the passed-in Get action, but also return the ByteString that the Get consumed. The use case is that I have a binary structure that I need to both parse and hash, and I don't know the length before parsing it.

This combinator, despite its simple semantics, is proving surprisingly tricky to implement.

Without delving into the internals of Get, my instinct was to use this monstrosity:

getConsumed :: Get a -> Get (B.ByteString, a)
getConsumed g = do
  (len, r) <- lookAhead $ do
                before <- remaining
                res <- g
                after <- remaining
                return (before - after, res)
  bs <- getBytes len
  return (bs, r)

Which will use lookahead, peek at the remaining bytes before and after running the action, return the result of the action, and then consume the length. This shouldn't duplicate any work, but it occasionally fails with:

*** Exception: GetException "Failed reading: getBytes: negative length requested\nEmpty call stack\n"

so I must be misunderstanding something about cereal somewhere.

Does anyone see what's wrong with my definition of getconsumed or have a better idea for how to implement it?

Edit: Dan Doel points out that remaining can just return the remaining length of a given chunk, which isn't very useful if you cross a chunk boundary. I'm not sure what the point of the action is, in that case, but that explains why my code wasn't working! Now I just need to find a viable alternative.

Edit 2: after thinking about it some more, it seems like the fact that remaining gives me the length of the current chunk can be to my advantage if I feed the Get manually with individual chunks (remaining >>= getBytes) in a loop and keep track of what it's eating as I do it. I haven't managed to get this approach working either yet, but it seems more promising than the original one.

Edit 3: if anyone's curious, here's code from edit 2 above:

getChunk :: Get B.ByteString
getChunk = remaining >>= getBytes

getConsumed :: Get a -> Get (B.ByteString, a)
getConsumed g = do
    (len, res) <- lookAhead $ measure g
    bs <- getBytes len
    return (bs, res)
  where
  measure :: Get a -> Get (Int ,a)
  measure g = do
    chunk <- getChunk
    measure' (B.length chunk) (runGetPartial g chunk)

  measure' :: Int -> Result a -> Get (Int, a)
  measure' !n (Fail e) = fail e
  measure' !n (Done r bs) = return (n - B.length bs, r)
  measure' !n (Partial f) = do
    chunk <- getChunk
    measure' (n + B.length chunk) (f chunk)

Unfortunately, it still seems to fail after a while on my sample input with:

*** Exception: GetException "Failed reading: too few bytes\nFrom:\tdemandInput\n\n\nEmpty call stack\n"
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FWIW with the iteratee package this is enumWith parser stream2stream, which basically does exactly what you suggest in your second edit. You might find that definition useful, or possibly countConsumed which does something slightly different but is simpler to grok. –  John L Jul 11 '12 at 8:29
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

EDIT: Another solution, which does no extra computation!

getConsumed :: Get a -> Get (B.ByteString, a)
getConsumed g = do
  (len, r) <- lookAhead $ do
                (res,after) <- lookAhead $ liftM2 (,) g remaining
                total <- remaining
                return (total-after, res)
  bs <- getBytes len
  return (bs, r)

One solution is to call lookAhead twice. The first time makes sure that all necessary chunks are loaded, and the second performs the actual length computation (along with returning the deserialized data).

getConsumed :: Get a -> Get (B.ByteString, a)
getConsumed g = do
  _ <- lookAhead g -- Make sure all necessary chunks are preloaded
  (len, r) <- lookAhead $ do
                before <- remaining
                res <- g
                after <- remaining
                return (before - after, res)
  bs <- getBytes len
  return (bs, r)
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Your second option would perform (at least a subset of) g's work twice, right? The first one appears to work though. Thanks! –  copumpkin Jul 11 '12 at 14:15
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The Cereal package does not store enough information to simply implement what you want. I expect that your idea of using chunks might work, or perhaps a special runGet. Forking Cereal and using the internals is probably your easiest path.

Writing your own can work, this is what I did when making the protocol-buffers library. My custom Text.ProtocolBuffers.Get library does implement enough machinery to do what you want:

import Text.ProtocolBuffers.Get
import Control.Applicative
import qualified Data.ByteString as B

getConsumed :: Get a -> Get (B.ByteString, a)
getConsumed thing = do
  start <- bytesRead
  (a,stop) <- lookAhead ((,) <$> thing <*> bytesRead)
  bs <- getByteString (fromIntegral (stop-start))
  return (bs,a)

This is clear because my library tracks the number of byteRead. Otherwise the API is quite similar to Cereal.

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That's cool, but the main reason I'm using cereal is the easy support for it in other libraries, like conduit :/ –  copumpkin Jul 11 '12 at 14:07
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