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The problem is: Given a collection of numbers that might contain duplicates, return all unique permutations. The naive way is using a set(in c++) to hold the permutations. This take O(n!*lg(n!)). Is there better solution?

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Since there are n! permutations of n distinct integers, you cannot do better than O(n!) if you are required to enumerate them. Also note that the presence of duplicates is irrelevant since the process of removing the duplicates takes a negligible amount of time compared to enumerating the permutations. –  verdesmarald Jul 11 '12 at 3:27
    
@veredesmarald. Yes, I am trying to reduce the time complexity to O(n!). –  zwx Jul 11 '12 at 3:33
    
Sounds homework-ey. –  SchighSchagh Jul 11 '12 at 3:34
    
1. next_permutation (in C++ STL) visits every permutation exactly once even when there are duplicates. 2. The space requirement alone is O(nn!), not O(n!). 3. Inserting all n! permutations in an STL set would take O(n! log(n!)) = O(nn!*logn) –  bloops Jul 11 '12 at 3:51
    
@bloops I believe the point of the excercise is to implement next_permutation. Also I perhaps should have qualified that I was talking about time complexity only, and I would just store them in a list (since the next perm algo already excludes the duplicates). –  verdesmarald Jul 11 '12 at 3:55

4 Answers 4

1) Some variation on backtracking/recursive search will usually solve this sort of problem. Given a function to return a list of all permutations on (n-1) objects, generate a list of all permutations on n objects as follows: for each element in the list insert the nth object in all possible positions, checking for duplicates. This isn't especially efficient, but it often generates straightforward code for this sort of problem.

2) See Wikipedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permutation#Generation_in_lexicographic_order

3) Academics have spent a lot of time on details of this. See section 7.2.1.2 of Knuth Vol 4A - this is a large hardback book with the following brief table of contents on Amazon:

Chapter 7: Combinatorial Searching 1

7.1: Zeros and Ones 47

7.2: Generating All Possibilities 281

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The simplest approach is as follows:

  1. Sort the list: O(n lg n)
  2. The sorted list is the first permutation
  3. Repeatedly generate the "next" permutation from the previous one: O(n! * <complexity of finding next permutaion>)

Step 3 can be accomplished by defining the next permutation as the one that would appear directly after the current permutation if the list of permutations was sorted, e.g.:

1, 2, 2, 3
1, 2, 3, 2
1, 3, 2, 2
2, 1, 2, 3
2, 1, 3, 2
2, 2, 1, 3
...

Finding the next lexicographic permutation is O(n), and simple description is given on the Wikipedia page for permutation under the heading Generation in lexicographic order. If you are feeling ambitious, you can generate the next permutation in O(1) using plain changes

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Updated: I originally misread the question and thought duplicates were supposed to be discarded before computing the permutations. –  verdesmarald Jul 11 '12 at 3:44
    
The next_permutation is the point. And there is no homework in summer:) –  zwx Jul 11 '12 at 4:03
    
@zwx Where I live, it's winter. :) I have added some links to next perm algorithms, if you run into any specific difficulties I'll be happy to help but otherwise I don't see any merit in me retyping the algorithms here. –  verdesmarald Jul 11 '12 at 6:34
1  
The complexity of the "regular" next_permutation algorithm is O(1) amortized over all permutations. So if you are visiting all permutations, that's optimal. –  bloops Jul 11 '12 at 14:07
    
@bloops It appears you are correct. I didn't know that, thanks! –  verdesmarald Jul 12 '12 at 0:52

You should read my blog post on this kind of permutation (amongst other things) to get more background - and follow some of the links there.

Here is a version of my Lexicographic permutations generator fashioned after the generation sequence of Steinhaus–Johnson–Trotter permutation generators that does as requested:

def l_perm3(items):
    '''Generator yielding Lexicographic permutations of a list of items'''
    if not items:
        yield []
    else:
        dir = 1
        new_items = []
        this = [items.pop()]
        for item in l_perm3(items):
            lenitem = len(item)
            try:
                # Never insert 'this' above any other 'this' in the item 
                maxinsert = item.index(this[0])
            except ValueError:
                maxinsert = lenitem
            if dir == 1:
                # step down
                for new_item in [item[:i] + this + item[i:] 
                                 for i in range(lenitem, -1, -1)
                                 if i <= maxinsert]:
                    yield new_item                    
            else:    
                # step up
                for new_item in [item[:i] + this + item[i:] 
                                 for i in range(lenitem + 1)
                                 if i <= maxinsert]:
                    yield new_item                    
            dir *= -1

from math import factorial
def l_perm_length(items):
    '''\
    Returns the len of sequence of lexicographic perms of items. 
    Each item of items must itself be hashable'''
    counts = [items.count(item) for item in set(items)]
    ans = factorial(len(items))
    for c in counts:
        ans /= factorial(c)
    return ans

if __name__ == '__main__':
    n = [0, 1, 2, 2, 2]
    print '\nLexicograpic Permutations of %i items: %r' % (len(n), n)
    for i, x in enumerate(l_perm3(n[:])):
        print('%3i %r' % (i, x))
    assert i+1 == l_perm_length(n), 'Generated number of permutations is wrong'  

The output from the above program is the following for example:

Lexicograpic Permutations of 5 items: [0, 1, 2, 2, 2]
  0 [0, 1, 2, 2, 2]
  1 [0, 2, 1, 2, 2]
  2 [2, 0, 1, 2, 2]
  3 [2, 0, 2, 1, 2]
  4 [0, 2, 2, 1, 2]
  5 [2, 2, 0, 1, 2]
  6 [2, 2, 0, 2, 1]
  7 [0, 2, 2, 2, 1]
  8 [2, 0, 2, 2, 1]
  9 [2, 2, 2, 0, 1]
 10 [2, 2, 2, 1, 0]
 11 [2, 1, 2, 2, 0]
 12 [1, 2, 2, 2, 0]
 13 [2, 2, 1, 2, 0]
 14 [2, 2, 1, 0, 2]
 15 [1, 2, 2, 0, 2]
 16 [2, 1, 2, 0, 2]
 17 [2, 1, 0, 2, 2]
 18 [1, 2, 0, 2, 2]
 19 [1, 0, 2, 2, 2]
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This one I invented after thinking about how I have written out permutations by hand and putting that method in code is shorter and better:

def incv(prefix,v):
  list = []
  done = {}
  if v:
    for x in xrange(len(v)):
      if v[x] not in done:
        done[v[x]] = 1
        list = list + incv(prefix+v[x:x+1],v[:x] + v[x+1:])
  else:
    list.append(''.join(prefix))
  return list

def test(test_string,lex_ord=False):
  if lex_ord:
    test_string = [x for x in test_string]
    test_string.sort()
  p = incv([],[x for x in test_string])
  if lex_ord:
    try_p = p[::]
    try_p.sort()
    print "Sort methods equal ?", try_p == p
  print 'All', ','.join(p), "\n", test_string, "gave", len(p), "permutations"

if __name__ == '__main__':
  import sys
  test(sys.argv[1],bool(sys.argv[2] if len(sys.argv) > 2 else False))

Notes

  • incv increments the permutation vector to find all of them. It also correctly handles repeat letters.
  • test prints out all permutations and their count for the test string. It also makes sure that if you request lexicographic ordering that the sort before and sort after methods are the same. This should be True since the original string is ordered and the increment permutation function transforms the string into the next lexicographic string by the given alphabet.

This script can be run at the command prompt by:

python script.py [test_string] [optional anything to use lexicographic ordering]

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