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I have a C lib and want to call function in this library from C# application. I tried creating a C++/CLI wrapper on the C lib by adding the C lib file as linker input and adding the source files as additional dependencies.

Is there any better way to achieve this as am not sure how to add C output to c# application.

My C Code -

__declspec(dllexport) unsigned long ConnectSession(unsigned long handle,
                            unsigned char * publicKey,
                            unsigned char   publicKeyLen);

My CPP Wrapper -

long MyClass::ConnectSessionWrapper(unsigned long handle,
                                unsigned char * publicKey,
                                unsigned char   publicKeyLen)
    {
        return ConnectSession(handle, publicKey, publicKeyLen);
    }
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2  
yeah its possible, and there are many examples if you google it, but no idea what your problem is from the limited information –  Keith Nicholas Jul 11 '12 at 3:44
1  
Please post your code. –  Jack Jul 11 '12 at 3:46
    
If it hurts when you do X, stop doing X. Rename your C++ wrapper method to rule that out as a source of the problem. And post your code :-) –  Eric J. Jul 11 '12 at 3:48
    
I have a c library provided by a vendor which has functions like ConnectToMachine(unsigned char * psig, char apt). I want to cal this function from my c# class. –  Chinjoo Jul 11 '12 at 3:48
2  
Look into PInvoke –  Mark Hall Jul 11 '12 at 3:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted
+50

The example will be, for Linux:

1) Create a C file, libtest.c with this content:

#include <stdio.h>

void print(const char *message)
{
  printf("%s\\n", message);
}

That’s a simple pseudo-wrapper for printf. But represents any C function in the library you want to call. If you have a C++ function don’t forget to put extern C to avoid mangling the name.

2) create the C# file

using System;

using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

public class Tester
{
        [DllImport("libtest.so", EntryPoint="print")]

        static extern void print(string message);

        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {

                print("Hello World C# => C++");
        }
}

3) Unless you have the library libtest.so in a standard library path like “/usr/lib”, you are likely to see a System.DllNotFoundException, to fix this you can move your libtest.so to /usr/lib, or better yet, just add your CWD to the library path: export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=pwd

credits from here

EDIT

For Windows, it's not much different. Taking an example from here, you only have yo enclose in your *.cpp file your method with extern "C" Something like

extern "C"
{
//Note: must use __declspec(dllexport) to make (export) methods as 'public'
      __declspec(dllexport) void DoSomethingInC(unsigned short int ExampleParam, unsigned char AnotherExampleParam)
      {
            printf("You called method DoSomethingInC(), You passed in %d and %c\n\r", ExampleParam, AnotherExampleParam);
      }
}//End 'extern "C"' to prevent name mangling

then, compile, and in your C# file do

[DllImport("C_DLL_with_Csharp.dll", EntryPoint="DoSomethingInC")]

public static extern void DoSomethingInC(ushort ExampleParam, char AnotherExampleParam);

and then just use it:

using System;

    using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

    public class Tester
    {
            [DllImport("C_DLL_with_Csharp.dll", EntryPoint="DoSomethingInC")]

    public static extern void DoSomethingInC(ushort ExampleParam, char AnotherExampleParam);

            public static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                    ushort var1 = 2;
                    char var2 = '';  
                    DoSomethingInC(var1, var2);
            }
    }
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3  
Good example! This is a very good example of using Interop. It's obviously Linux (not Windows), but the principle is the same. This is EXACTLY the approach I'd recommend to the OP. –  paulsm4 Jul 11 '12 at 3:59
    
Could some one edit the answer? I got problems with the include, doesn't show stdio.h –  Gonzalo.- Jul 11 '12 at 3:59
    
@paulsm4 thanks for the edit !! –  Gonzalo.- Jul 11 '12 at 4:03
    
guess that should work.. but notsure how to get the output as .so from vs2010.. it only gives .lib and .dll, again .dll when set as dllimport given bad format excpetion –  Chinjoo Jul 11 '12 at 7:22
1  
@Chinjoo consider this codeproject.com/Articles/6912/…. Have you modify your C code, adding _declspec(dllexport) ? If this example works for you, I will add it to the answer –  Gonzalo.- Jul 16 '12 at 17:32

Okay well, Open VS 2010, Goto File -> New -> Project -> Visual C++ -> Win32 -> Win32 Project and give it a name (HelloWorldDll in my case), Then in the window that follows under Application Type choose 'DLL' and under Additonal Options choose 'Empty Project'.

Now goto your Solution Explorer tab usually right hand side of VS window, right click Source Files -> Add Item -> C++ file (.cpp) and give it a name (HelloWorld in my case)

Then in the new class paste this code:

#include <stdio.h>

extern "C"
{
  __declspec(dllexport) void DisplayHelloFromDLL()
  {
    printf ("Hello from DLL !\n");
  }
}

Now Build the project, after navigate to your projects DEBUG folder and there you should find: HelloWorldDll.dll.

Now, lets create our C# app which will access the dll, Goto File -> New -> Project -> Visual C# -> Console Application and give it a name (CallDllCSharp), now copy and paste this code to your main:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
...
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("This is C# program");
            DisplayHelloFromDLL();
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

and build the program, now that we have both our apps built lets use them, get your *.dll and your .exe (bin/debug/.exe) in the same directory, and execute the application output should be

This is C# program

Hello from DLL !

Hope that clears some of your issues up.

References:

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You can directly call C functions from C# by using P/Invoke.
Here's a short how-to on creating a C# lbrary that wraps around a C dll.

  1. Create a new C# Library project (I'll call it "Wrapper")
  2. Add a Win32 project to the solution, set application type to: DLL (I'll call it "CLibrary")

    • You can remove all the other cpp/h files since we won't need them
    • Rename the CLibrary.cpp file to CLibrary.c
    • Add a CLibrary.h header file
  3. Now we need to configure the CLibrary project, right-click it and go to properties, and select Configuration: "All Configurations"

    • In Configuration Properties > C/C++ > Precompiled headers, set Precompiled Headers to: "Not using Precompiled Headers"
    • In the same C/C++ branch, go to Advanced, change Compile As to: "Compile as C code (/TC)"
    • Now in the Linker branch, go to General, and change Output File to: "$(SolutionDir)Wrapper\$(ProjectName).dll", this will copy the built C DLL to the C# project root.

CLibrary.h

__declspec(dllexport) unsigned long ConnectSession(unsigned long   handle,
                                                   unsigned char * publicKey,
                                                   unsigned char   publicKeyLen);

CLibrary.c

#include "CLibrary.h"

unsigned unsigned long ConnectSession(unsigned long   handle,
                                      unsigned char * publicKey,
                                      unsigned char   publicKeyLen)
{
    return 42;
}
  • Right-click CLibrary project, build it, so we get the DLL in the C# project directory
  • Right-click C# Wrapper project, add existing item, add CLibrary.dll
  • Click on CLibrary.dll, go to the properties pane, set "Copy to output Directory" to "Copy Always"

It's a good idea to make the Wrapper project dependent on CLibrary so CLibrary gets built first, you can do that by right-clicking the Wrapper project, going to "Project Dependencies" and checking "CLibrary". Now for the actual wrapper code:

ConnectSessionWrapper.cs

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace Wrapper
{
    public class ConnectSessionWrapper
    {
        [DllImport("CLibrary.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
        unsafe static extern UInt32 ConnectSession(UInt32 handle,
                                                   char*  publicKey,
                                                   char   publicKeyLen);

        public unsafe UInt32 GetConnectSession(UInt32 handle, 
                                               string publicKey,
                                               char publicKeyLen)
        {
            //"Convert" string to char*
            char* pubKey;
            fixed (char* bptr = publicKey)
            {
                pubKey = (char*)bptr;
            }

            return ConnectSession(handle, pubKey, publicKeyLen);
        }
    }
}
  • The final thing you need to do is right-click the Wrapper project, set Configuration to "All Configurations", and check Allow unsafe code.
    The only reason for using unsafe code is because you had a char* as a parameter and we needed to convert a string to fixed char pointer.

Result:
Testing wrapper library in a console application

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