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Here is my Node.JS code

var rec = spawn('rec.exe');
rec.stdout.setEncoding('ascii');
rec.stdout.on('data', function (data) {
console.log(data);
    //do something
}
);

And my C++ program (compiled by Cygwin) writes something to stdout using printf().

if(bufsize!=0&&rec[0]=='0')
    {
    printf("%s\n",rec);
    //printf("Received,write into exchange file\n");
    //fp=fopen("recvdata.txt","w");
    //fprintf(fp,"%s\n",rec);
        //fclose(fp);
}

But the data event is never emitted.

I'm sure there is something wrong with my C++ code because it works with some other commands like ping.

Then I noticed that in this case, the event is emitted

if(fd==-1)
{
    printf("Failed,again\n");
    return 0;
}

It means when the process exits, everything works fine. But that's not what I want.

Can someone help me? Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sounds like you've got a buffering issue with your C++ program; it's probably not automatically flushing stdout's buffers with each line, so all the output "bunches up" until it exits. I know there are some ioctl settings that it could use to change that, but I've long since forgotten what they are. A search on "stdout buffering" might bring up something useful.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, a fflush behind printf works. – user840866 Jul 11 '12 at 8:33

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