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i.e.

class A {
    public:
    A(Apar1, Apar2, Apar3 /* and so on ... */);
};

class B {
public:
    B(Bpar1, Bpar2, Bpar3 /* and so on ... */);
};

class C {
public:
    // C();
private:
    A m_a;
    B m_b;
};

where C construct depends on A and B, so

  1. the constructor of C must be the following signature?

    C::C(Apar1, Apar2, Apar3, Bpar1, Bpar2, Bpar3)

  2. How can I construct C in a natural way?

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what your "natural way" meaning ? –  hqt Jul 11 '12 at 4:40
    
@hqt A pretty way, too many parameters bring bad smell –  KaiWen Jul 11 '12 at 5:10
    
Thanks for accepting my answer, +1 on your question. –  jxh Jul 11 '12 at 5:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could create a constructor like this instead:

class C {
public:
    C (const A &a, const B &b) : m_a(a), m_b(b) {}
private:
    A m_a;
    B m_b;
};

C c(A(...),
    B(...));

Whether or not you find this more natural or not is a matter of taste,

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The constructor for C must initialize m_a and m_b. It may do so with parameters that it receives, or it may do so with any other value that is available. Consider these constructors:

C::C(Apar1 a1, Apar2 a2, Apar3 a3, Bpar1 b1, Bpar2 b2, Bpar b3) :
  m_a(a1, a2, a3), m_b(b1, b2, b3) {}
C::C() :
  m_a(6,7,42), m_b("hello", "cruel", "world") {}
C::C(const C& c) :
  m_a(c.m_a.a1, c.m_a.a2, c.m_a.a3), m_b(c.m_b.b1, c.m_b.b2, c.m_b.b3) {}

In each case, C's constructor uses an initializer list to invoke the constructors of A and B. In the first case the values were passed in. In the second case, the values were predefined. In the final case, the values were computed from an argument.

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No one cal tell you what is the natural way, it all depends on your design.

It maybe natural in some case to have something like:

class C {

public:
  C(A& a, B& b) : m_a(a), m_b(b) {
  }

private:
  A& m_a;
  B& m_b;
}

but all depends on your design

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