Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
def test_find_update():
    db = Connection()
    db.drop_collection("test")
    db.test.insert({"x":1,"y":2})
    start = time.time()
    for i in range(1,10000):
        y = db.test.find_one()
    print db.test.find_one()
    print time.time()-start

    db.drop_collection("test")
    start = time.time()
    for i in range(1,10000):
        db.test.insert({"x":1,"y":2})
    print db.test.find_one()
    print time.time()-start

    db.drop_collection("test")
    db.test.insert({"x":1,"y":2})
    start = time.time()
    for i in range(1,10000):
        db.test.update({},{"$inc":{"x":1,"y":2}})
    print db.test.find_one()
    print time.time()-start

result:

{u'y': 2, u'x': 1, u'_id': ObjectId('4ffd159ae3f0f8103a000000')}
    **9.78821802139**
{u'y': 2, u'x': 1, u'_id': ObjectId('4ffd15a4e3f0f8103a000001')}
    **0.82381606102**
{u'y': 200000, u'x': 100000, u'_id': ObjectId('4ffd15a5e3f0f8103a002710')}
    **0.635884046555**

I think find operator may be so cheap, but it is opposite to my assumption. Can anyone tell me why find operator is so time consuming?

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to test? Non-indexed finds versus fire-and-forget writes? 10k documents in a single query? This doesn't sound like a particularly informative test since it has no relation with anything you'd do in production systems. –  Remon van Vliet Jul 11 '12 at 9:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you issue a insert or update call from PyMongo it will not wait for a reply from the server, but instead it will return immediatly. If you change your code so that the update and insert call look like this:

db.test.insert({"x":1,"y":2}, safe=True)
db.test.update({},{"$inc":{"x":1,"y":2}}, safe=True)

It will take a lot longer:

{u'y': 2, u'x': 1, u'_id': ObjectId('4ffd1d8d29277b1606000000')}
 2.05725502968
{u'y': 2, u'x': 1, u'_id': ObjectId('4ffd1d8f29277b1606000001')}
 1.98976802826
{u'y': 20000, u'x': 10000, u'_id': ObjectId('4ffd1d9129277b1606002710')}
 1.96105003357

For reference see the docs on pymongo.collection.

Edit: I'm not sure what you are trying to test here, because in real life this situation would probablt not occur. If you find yourself sequentially find()'ing 10000 documents you should probably consider a batch operation, or another DB schema. Maybe a bit of denormalization can help you out.

share|improve this answer
    
Not to mention that the recorded query time is only 0.97 milliseconds per query. That's reasonably fast, especially when you consider that a significant portion of that time is probably network. –  Sean Reilly Jul 11 '12 at 6:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.