Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i was asked a question in interview what happens if we put finally block between try and catch block i answered in that case compiler will think that there is no catch block and it will directly execute finally block. Then he asked why is it not possible to put code between try and catch block?

Can you please help me...

share|improve this question
8  
Your answer to the first question is wrong. The compiler isn't going to think that there is no catch block. It's obviously still there in your code, and the fact that it then comes right after the finally block will cause a compile-time error. –  BoltClock Jul 11 '12 at 6:40
    
BoltClock is correct - you get a compiler error on your first question. catch must be immediately preceded by a try –  StuartLC Jul 11 '12 at 6:44
1  
The catch block syntactically has to be immediately after the try block . No other reasons . –  Sabbath Jul 11 '12 at 6:47

5 Answers 5

Okay, first thing first - the compiler doesn't execute the code, it just compiles it, allowing it to be run by the JVM.

Empirically speaking, that wouldn't make too much sense, since if you have some code that you would want to put outside the try block but before the catch block, the code could just as well be placed in the try block. The thing is, it would just behave as it were in the try block anyway if you think about it.

Let's assume this is valid Java (this doesn't compile):

try {
    throw new Exception();
}
System.out.println("Sup!");
catch(Exception e) { }

When the exception gets thrown, that line that prints out Sup! will still get skipped as the JVM is searching to jump to the appropriate exception handler to treat Exception. So, in a way, the code behaves just as it would if it were in the try {} block itself, which is why it wouldn't really matter where it is, and the Java specifies that this (now proven useless) construct is illegal.

Now what if that code after the try were to throw another exception itself? If it were valid code, it would behave just like a nested try...catch block in the original try block. Of course that once things start getting complicated, the approach where there is no clear connection between a try and a catch block could get fuzzy, and the JVM would end up not knowing which catch/finally belongs to which try block (especially since the handler doesn't have to be in the same function, or even in the same package!).

share|improve this answer
    
best answer so far! (+1) –  alfasin Jul 11 '12 at 7:00
    
Thanks! Added a few more little things (especially a clearer statement about the wrongness of my little Java snippet) –  Andrei Bârsan Jul 11 '12 at 7:02
1  
Note at the JVM level there's no requirement that try blocks be nested. You can have foo(); bar(); baz();, and have both foo() and baz() catch exceptions and jump to the same catch code, while bar() goes to a different one. All that happens is there's a table showing which bytecode ranges go to which catch handlers; the compiler can set up this table any way it likes. So while this kind of construct might confuse javac, the JVM is happy to implement whatever semantics you define for it. –  bdonlan Jul 11 '12 at 8:18

Well it would mean something like this :

try
{
   somCode();
}
someMoreCode();
catch
{
}

What should this mean ? This is not possible because it has no semantic, and therefore it has been decided to be syntaxically incorrect by language designers!

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes it is... a short one, a shorter one thant yours that's true, but it is. What I said is entirely right: this could not be analyzed by compiler cause java designers decided it would have no sense, so it has been forbidden by syntax. exactly as if I said " car turkey a eats" : it has no semantics and therefore it has been forbidden by syntax –  Kek Jul 11 '12 at 7:05

Well, the flippant answer is that the language spec forbids it.

But let's step back a bit and think about it a different way - what if you could do this?

try {
  foo();
}
bar();
catch (Exception e) {
  baz();
}

What could the semantics of this be? If we catch an exception in foo(), is baz() called? What about bar()? If bar() throws, do we catch the exception in that case?

If exceptions in bar() are not caught, and exception in foo() prevent bar() from running, then the construct is equivalent to:

try {
  foo();
} catch (Exception e) {
  baz();
}
bar();

If exceptions in bar() are caught, and exception in foo() prevent bar() from running, then the construct is equivalent to:

try {
  foo();
  bar();
} catch (Exception e) {
  baz();
}

If exceptions in bar() are not caught, and exception in foo() do not prevent bar() from running (bar() is always executed), then the construct is equivalent to:

try {
  foo();
} catch (Exception e) {
  baz();
} finally {
  bar();
}

As you can see, any reasonable semantics for this between-try-catch construct are already expressible without the need for a new - and rather confusing - construct. It's hard to devise a meaning for this construct that is not already redundant.

As an aside, one potential reason we can't do:

try {
  foo();
} finally {
  bar();
} catch (Exception e) {
  baz();
}

could be that it does not reflect actual execution order - catch blocks run before the finally block. This allows catch blocks to make use of resources that the finally block might release later (for example, to request additional diagnostic information from a RPC object or something). Could be made to work the other way as well? Sure. Is it worth it? Probably not.

share|improve this answer

If you have a try you must have either catch or finally, as defined in the java language specification, 14.20 "The try Statement`

share|improve this answer

try and catch like .. if and else .. so there is no need to add code between try and catch block

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.