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In order to up performance on a WrapPanel, I have introduced threading to my WP7 app. There's a long List of Item-objects in one list, that one by one is added to another `List. I have the following two lists:

public List<Item> OriginalItems;
public List<Item> CopyOfItems;

The logic that's put inside the BackgroundWorker.DoWork event handler is as follows:

workerThread.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler((object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) =>
{
    foreach (var item in OriginalItems)
    {
        Deployment.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
        {
            CopyOfItems.Add(item);
        });

        // I feel sooo sleepy
    }
});

Now, this works just fine when I replace my comment with Thread.Sleep(150) - but anything less (and every once in a while even with larger values) makes the code put in the same element several times in a row.

Why is this, and how can it be fixed?

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Why do you use BeginInvoke on these items? Don't seems that you are working with UI elements? –  Steve Jul 11 '12 at 7:10
    
It updates a list that's databound to the UI (the code presented above resides in a ViewModel) –  Kris Selbekk Jul 11 '12 at 7:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a known wrinkle in C# - and actually one which is being fixed in C# 5. When you capture the loop variable from a foreach loop in a lambda expression, you're capturing one variable. That variable changes its value through the loop - so if you execute the delegate created from the lambda expression after the "original" iteration as completed, you'll see the value from the "current" iteration instead.

A simple work around is to declare and initialize a copy of the iteration variable in the loop, and capture that:

foreach (var item in OriginalItems)
{
    var copy = item;
    Deployment.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
    {
        CopyOfItems.Add(copy);
    });

    // I feel sooo sleepy
}

See Eric Lippert's blog post "Closing over the loop variable considered harmful" for more details on this.

Does your real code actually do any work in the loop, by the way? It's not clear that you're really using threading to do anything significant other than splitting the UI thread work into several chunks - which can be done without a BackgroundWorker.

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This worked great, thank you! To answer your final question - it doesn't do anything else than what you've seen, but without going into detail, I need to delay the rendering of some ListBoxItems a bit to load a view. You mention there is a different way to do the same, do you care to elaborate? Again, thanks, I learned something new! –  Kris Selbekk Jul 11 '12 at 7:20
    
@KrisSelbekk - Please mark this as an answer if this worked for you. –  Shakti Prakash Singh Jul 11 '12 at 7:25
1  
@KrisSelbekk: We'd need to know more detail, basically - and I'm afraid I'm not going to be around to give more feedback (about to go to breakfast). If this is working for you, maybe stick with it for the moment but ask another question with more details? (Someone else will answer it at least as well as I could, I'm sure.) –  Jon Skeet Jul 11 '12 at 7:27
    
@Jon Skeet - What if the worker takes more time to add and before the actual addition of the item to the second list happens, the next iteration is performed in the main thread. Wouldn't the value of copy variable change? Just curious. –  Shakti Prakash Singh Jul 11 '12 at 7:28

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