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Linq Select 5 items each time based on our enumerator

Our List e.g "theList" has 100 items, Want to go through the list and Select 5 items in each iterations,

Sample Code, which we want to change this into our desired result :

        theList = dt.AsEnumerable()
            .Select(row => new CustItem
            {
                Name = row.Field<string>("tName"),
                Title = row.Field<string>("tTitle"),
            }).ToList();

We should Iterate it within a loop and process on the selected 5 items each time, or pass it to our other methods :

something like it :

for (int i=0; i < 20 ; i++)

I want to use "i" enumerator on the linq select statement and make a multiplicity to make the boundaries of our new resultset.

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stackoverflow.com/questions/8083668/… stackoverflow.com/questions/2342167/… these 2 links may help you... –  user518692 Jul 11 '12 at 7:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 23 down vote accepted
for (int i=0; i < 20 ; i++)
{
    var fiveitems = theList.Skip(i*5).Take(5);
}
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It's the piece of code which I was looking for, Thanks –  Sypress Jul 11 '12 at 7:18

It sounds like you want the Batch operator from MoreLINQ:

foreach (var batch in query.Batch(5))
{
    foreach (var item in batch)
    {
        ...
    } 
}
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Hi Jon, Seems to be interesting, but needed it to be ordered, Is it ? –  Sypress Jul 11 '12 at 7:16
2  
Hi Jon, Can you please tell that is there any thing wrong with approach of Govind? –  Asif Mushtaq Jul 11 '12 at 7:18
3  
@Asif: Well, that will iterate over the source multiple times, which may not be ideal. It's okay if this really is a List, but if it's something you don't want to put into memory (e.g. you're streaming lines from a text file) you don't want to start reading the file again for each batch. –  Jon Skeet Jul 11 '12 at 7:24
2  
You could use Jon's "SmartEnumerable" extension: msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2007/07/27/… –  Matthew Watson Jul 11 '12 at 7:49
1  
@Sypress: No, there's no indicator of a "batch number" at the moment, although as Matthew says, you could use SmartEnumerable if you want. –  Jon Skeet Jul 11 '12 at 9:26

You can also do this with pure linq by taking advantage of integer arithmetic and the GroupBy method:

int blockSize = 5;
var group = theList.Select((x, index) => new { x, index })
                   .GroupBy(x => x.index / blockSize, y => y.x)

foreach (var block in group)
{
    // "block" will be an instance of IEnumerable<T>
    ...
}

There are a number of advantages to this approach which aren't necessarily immediately apparent:

  • Execution is deferred, so it's efficient when you're working with conditional processing
  • You don't need to know the length of the collection, thus avoiding multiple enumeration while also being generally cleaner than other approaches
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Thanks it could help also, +1, could you tell also a bit on the x,y,blocksize and the index ? The index seems to be the starting point in the collection, what about the others ? also a problem here is that we need to know the index of the item within the Enumerable List which we selected, Here should be the "group". I haven't tried this way yet. –  Sypress Jul 12 '12 at 11:06
1  
The overload of Select which I used takes a 2-parameter Func, where the parameters are the item (as with a normal Select) and its index. The code then projects that into a new datatype which contains the original item with its index. The GroupBy is simple - since integer division always rounds down, index/blocksize will be the same for each item in a block (i.e. '0/5 == 1/5 == 2/5 == 3/5 == 4/5'). My last step, y => y.x just extracts the original item out again, but if you want to retain the index, don't include that final lambda. –  Simon MᶜKenzie Jul 12 '12 at 12:14
    
thanks, Will try it, could be useful –  Sypress Jul 12 '12 at 13:31

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