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I know there were some questions about this opened, but I need a more "specific" example
and solution.

Here is my Example:
databse.class.php

class db{ 
   public function connect($conStr){...} 
} 

func.class.php

func class{ 
   public insert_song(){ 
      //ineed to use the conenct method from database 
      //then I would INERT INTO... 
   } 
}

Questions:
1) Should I require or extend the db class in func class?
2) If I require, will the scope of the db class functions will remain? (lets say if I have a private variable there, will it be accessible from the out side?)

share|improve this question
    
What is the job of the func class? And for file-naming I suggest you choose something PSR-0 compatible, so that you can use a standard auto-loader and more easily integrate other author's code, too. – hakre Jul 11 '12 at 7:55
    
@hakre, as you can see it's job is to use the database methods and create songs, search songs etc... what is auto-loader? – funerr Jul 11 '12 at 7:56
    
    
So func is a data-mapper for songs? That looks like you should do dependency injection. An autoloader/autoloading for PHP is explained here: php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.autoload.php - PSR-0 is here: github.com/php-fig/fig-standards/blob/master/accepted/PSR-0.md – hakre Jul 11 '12 at 7:59
1  
i.stack.imgur.com/JRjML.jpg – hakre Jul 11 '12 at 8:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As part of Abstraction, you should separate the responsibilities for your classes. Your Database class should care about your Songs (which is how you should name it) class.

If your Songs class uses the Database class, you should inject it in the constructor as follows:

<?php

class Database {
    public function connect($conStr) {
        /*
         * Connect to database here
         */
    }
}

class Songs {
    private $db;
    public function __construct(Database $db) {
        $this->db = $db;
    }

    public function insert_song($song) {
        /*
         * Now you can use $this->db as your database object!
         */
    }
}
share|improve this answer
  • No, you should not require or extend the database class.
  • No, private variables or methods never get available outside the class. Protected variables are available to child classes only, public variables are...public.

You could require the file in which the database class lives somewhere in your config, so you can instantiate the database class wherever and whenever you want. But, as you'll probably need only one instance of the database object, you could just instantiate it in the config and pass it around using Dependency injection.

This basically means that you pass the database object to other objects needing one. A common way of dealing with database objects is using Constructor injection, although setter injection would do as well.

What you do is something similar to this:

// config:
$db = new Database;
$db->setConnectionValues();

$fooClass = new Foo($db);
$fooClass->insertSomething();

// fooClass:
class Foo
{
    private $db;

    public function __construct(Database $db)
    {
        $this->db = $db;
    }

    public function insertSomething()
    {
        $this->db->query("INSERT");
    }
}

This solves most of your dependency problems.

share|improve this answer
// changed the class name, func is not good for a class name.
class Foo {
   protected $db;

   public setDb($db) {
     $this->db = $db;
   }

   public insert_song(){ 
      //ineed to use the conenct method from database 
      //then I would INERT INTO...
      $this->db->insert(...); 
   } 
}

Example:

// omited the error handling.
$db = new db();
$db->connect();
$foo = new Foo();
$foo->setDb($db);
$foo->insert_songs();
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe even set the constructor receive $db param instead of setDb. One less line to write :) – Zagor23 Jul 11 '12 at 8:31
    
@Zagor23 Yes, there're two ways to do Dependency injection, use constructor or setter. Both has own merits. – xdazz Jul 11 '12 at 8:36

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