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I have a method call which I want to mock with mockito. To start with I have created and injected an instance of an object on which the method will be called. My aim is to verify one of the object in method call.

Is there a way that mockito allows you to assert or verify the object and it's attributes when the mock method is called?

example

Mockito.verify(mockedObject)
       .someMethodOnMockedObject(
              Mockito.<SomeObjectAsArgument>anyObject())

Instead of doing anyObject() i want to check that argument object contains some particular fields

Mockito.verify(mockedObject)
       .someMethodOnMockedObject(
              Mockito.<SomeObjectAsArgument>**compareWithThisObject()**)
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4 Answers 4

New feature added to Mockito makes this even easier,

ArgumentCaptor<Person> argument = ArgumentCaptor.forClass(Person.class);
verify(mock).doSomething(argument.capture());
assertEquals("John", argument.getValue().getName());

Take a look at Mockito documentation

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this should be the accepted answer –  Gab Oct 6 at 12:04
up vote 12 down vote accepted

http://sites.google.com/a/pintailconsultingllc.com/java/argument-matching-with-mockito

This link provides a working example. I was able to solve it with same strategy.

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One more possibility, if you don't want to use ArgumentCaptor (for example, because you're also using stubbing), is to use Hamcrest Matchers in combination with Mockito.

import org.mockito.Mockito
import org.hamcrest.Matchers
...

Mockito.verify(mockedObject).someMethodOnMockedObject(Mockito.argThat(
    Matchers.<SomeObjectAsArgument>hasProperty("propertyName", desiredValue)));
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I think the easiest way for verifying an argument object is to use the refEq method:

Mockito.verify(mockedObject).someMethodOnMockedObject(Matchers.refEq(objectToCompareWith));

It can be used even if the object doesn't implement equals(), because reflection is used. If you don't want to compare some fields, just add their names as arguments for refEq.

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